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    #1

    (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    The phrase two sacks of groceries is labeled American English in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. How would British English speakers say it?
    Last edited by sitifan; 21-Aug-2015 at 06:51.
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    Two loads of groceries.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    If you mean soemething like this, we Brits don't pack our groceries in what we'd call large paper bags. We used to have boxes of groceries. Now we tend to have (plastic) bags.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 21-Aug-2015 at 08:24. Reason: Fixing typo

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    #4

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    Two loads of groceries.
    I don't know any native speakers of BrE who would normally refer to a bag/box/sack of groceries as a load.

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    #5

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    I disagree with the dictionary. In AmE we usually refer to bags of groceries. The bags could be paper, plastic, or something reusable.

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    #6

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    I don't think"sacks of groceries" is common anyway. It implies a large quantity of groceries which would fill up the boot (or trunk) of a car as a carload of groceries.
    Last edited by tedmc; 21-Aug-2015 at 07:52.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    It certainly appears to be less common than bags: Ngram

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    #8

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    The newer edition of the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary changes the label American English into North American English

    [countable] (North American English) a strong paper bag for carrying shopping
    [countable] the contents of a sack
    They got through a sack of potatoes.
    (North American English) two sacks of groceries

    http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie.../sack_1?q=sack
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #9

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I don't think"sacks of groceries" is common anyway. It implies a large quantity of groceries which would fill up the boot (or trunk) of a car as a carload of groceries.
    I don't think 'sacks of groceries' implies someone has a car, but I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: (AmE) two sacks of groceries

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It certainly appears to be less common than bags: Ngram
    Calling bags "sacks" is more of a regional thing in the US. I get the sense that it is becoming less common.

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