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    #1

    5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    What does the sentence mean as follows?

    "5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!"

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    #2

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    What does the following sentence mean?

    "5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!"
    Where did you find that sentence? It's very poorly written.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    It means: "Five years of Latin dance lessons did indeed make me a successful contestant on So You Think You Can Dance, so there, Dad."

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    #4

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Just a gentle reminder to students that even in 2015, the S-word is still considered very vulgar by many people.

    If that young person had said, "S--- it" to his boss, that young person would probably have been fired (dismissed) or at least given an official warning.

    I respectfully suggest that learners NOT include that expression in their active vocabulary. NEVER use it, even with friends. If you do, one day you may

    accidentially say it to your boss, teacher, or business prospect.

    Generally speaking, the S-word means that you do not like something or someone:

    Mona: What do you think about our teacher?
    James: He s---s! (He's not a good teacher. Maybe he does not explain things clearly, maybe he has an unpleasant personality, etc.)

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    While I agree it's not always polite, I disagree that in this day and age it's still considered vulgar. I hear this word on a daily basis, even in the workplace. Depending on context, I'd say it has even become innocuous. I've had employers and teachers use the phrase 'It sucks.' 'It/that sucks' is a common way of expressing displeasure at something or to commiserate about a disagreeable situation.

    Suggesting that someone sucks is a little more offensive, since it implies ineptitude. However, in my mind, the offense comes from the suggestion of ineptitude, rather than the phrase itself.

    'Suck it' is a little more vulgar, as it can carry implications of fellatio, although not always.

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    #6

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    [1]I've had ... teachers use the phrase 'It sucks.'

    [2] 'Suck it' is a little more vulgar, as it can carry implications of ___ , although not always.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    [1] I have no doubt that, at least in my American city public (government-sponsored) schools, a teacher who said that would be asked to refrain. I have no doubt that some parents would be outraged if their children's teachers used such language on a regular basis.

    [2] In my opinion, since international students come here for advice, I do believe that we should suggest that they avoid those words. Yes, I agree that they may hear it in the business world, but that does not mean that they should use it. Some learners who come from certain cultures would be shocked if they knew the literal meaning of those two words. Their innocent use of those words could adversely affect their success in the global economy.

    In my opinion, it doesn't matter whether it's 1915 or 2015, most people lose a bit of respect for people (male and female) who regularly use coarse language.
    Last edited by TheParser; 22-Aug-2015 at 17:12.

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    #7

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    'Suck it' is a little more vulgar, as it can carry implications of fellatio, although not always.
    It's a fairly recent arrival in the UK, and I would say it's just imported slang here.

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    #8

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    I would say that a child saying "Suck it" to a teacher or a parent was being disrespectful or rude but I don't consider it vulgar. As far as saying that something "sucks", that is simply usage imported from AmE and it's not vulgar at all here.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    I'd say "suck it" from a child to a parent is pretty disrespectful. You'd have to know someone really well to be able to say it with laughter and not have it be offensive/rude.

    However, "that sucks" is so universal that it's hard for me to think that anyone would be offended these days.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. lotus888's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: 5 years of latin did pay off, suck it, dad!= ?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    [1] I have no doubt that, at least in my American city public (government-sponsored) schools, a teacher who said that would be asked to refrain. I have no doubt that some parents would be outraged if their children's teachers used such language on a regular basis.

    [2] In my opinion, since international students come here for advice, I do believe that we should suggest that they avoid those words. Yes, I agree that they may hear it in the business world, but that does not mean that they should use it. Some learners who come from certain cultures would be shocked if they knew the literal meaning of those two words. Their innocent use of those words could adversely affect their success in the global economy.

    In my opinion, it doesn't matter whether it's 1915 or 2015, most people lose a bit of respect for people (male and female) who regularly use coarse language.

    I agree. One need not to be a prude to value and propound a more eloquent and enlightened use of the language -- without clichés, especially with respect to second language learners.


    --lotus
    Last edited by lotus888; 23-Aug-2015 at 20:29.

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