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    #1

    Don't you have to

    Hi,

    *self-made*

    1- Don't you have to wear a tie at work? (Does it mean that it is not necessary or that there is no regulation?)

    2- Musn't you wear a tie at work? (Does it mean that it is not personally important for you to wear a tie at work or that it is forbidden to wear it?)

    I cannot decide exactly what they mean. Could you please tell me what they mean?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: Don't you have to

    Why would the questions mean those things to you?
    Questions are questions i.e. to seek your reply; they are not statements.
    But the way the two questions are asked sort of expects the answers to be in the affirmative.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Don't you have to

    Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage" (pages 336-337)

    - In questions, we use "must" to ask about what the hearer thinks is necessary.

    - We use "musn't" to say that it is wrong to do things, or to tell people not to do things.

    - To talk about an obligation that comes from "outside" (for instance a regulation, or an order from somebody else), we usually prefer "have to."

    However he does not mention how we should use "must" and "have to" in negative questions. So I have asked that question of you.

  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Don't you have to

    It's mustn't, not 'musn't', ademoglu.

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    #5

    Re: Don't you have to

    Sorry for that but what about the answer?

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    #6

    Re: Don't you have to

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Ademoglu:

    Of course, I do NOT have the confidence to answer your questions, but I do wish to share some advice from a very popular book that explains things clearly, presents practice lessons, and provides the answers in some editions, I hear.

    Following are its ideas (NOT mine).

    1. Sometimes one may use either: "You have to / must have a passport to visit foreign countries." / "Oh, it's later than I thought. I have to / must go now."

    2. "Must" often expresses personal feelings.

    a. "I must write to Ann. I haven't written to her for ages."
    b. "The government really must do something about unemployment."

    3. "Have to" often expresses facts.

    a. "Karen has to wear glasses (because her eyes are not very good)." [I slightly changed this sentence.]
    b. "I can't meet you on Friday. I have to work."


    Credit for this information goes to Raymond Murphy with Roann Altman for their Grammar in Use (1989) published by Cambridge University Press.
    Last edited by TheParser; 22-Aug-2015 at 17:46.

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    #7

    Re: Don't you have to

    Both questions assume that a tie is required. The questions are asking for confirmation. I don't like the question with "mustn't".

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