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    #1

    Arriving "to" seek

    Dear teachers

    In the following sentence:

    "Britain is swamped by a wave of expatriates arriving seek illegal work"

    Shall I add "to" between "arriving" and "seek"? Please advise.

    Cheers

    Holden English

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Arriving "to" seek

    Yes.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Arriving "to" seek

    You could also use "seeking".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Arriving "to" seek

    You should also end the sentence with a full stop (period).

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Arriving "to" seek

    Initially, I found the use of "expatriate" here rather odd. As a British person, the word "expatriate" means (to me) a British person living abroad. If we were being swamped by loads of expats coming to the UK, they would be British people who had decided to give up their life abroad and come "home". On that basis, they wouldn't be seeking illegal work at all. As British nationals, they would be legally entitled to work in the UK.

    I realise, of course, that you mean that the people who are heading to the UK are expatriates from their own countries. It's an unusual word to see in this context. In the UK, we usually see the word "migrants", "illegal migrants/immigrants" or simply "foreigners" in this context.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Arriving "to" seek

    Haha. That's exactly what I thought. If the person were British, why would they be doing illegal work in Britain?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 24-Aug-2015 at 09:35. Reason: Fixed minor typo

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