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    #1

    John and Alice are getting married (two meanings?)

    Hello,

    *self-made*

    - John and Alice are getting married.

    I would like to ask if the sentence could have two meanings.

    1- They are getting married to each other.
    2- They have each own spouse and they are getting married to them. Namely Alice and John are not getting married to each other.

    Thanks.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: John and Alice are getting married (two meanings?)

    We would normally assume the first meaning. The second is possible in the right context, though I would add 'both' after 'are' to make the intended meaning clearer.

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