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    #1

    two pounds and one pence

    Hi,

    - Two pounds and one pence.

    Does it mean "2.1" or "2.01"?

    Thanks.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    I think it means the latter because there are 100 pence in one pound, but I am not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    It's the second. I'd probably say Two pounds and a penny or Two pounds one p(ea).

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    #4

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    It cannot be the first, which would be two pounds ten, and written 2.10.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It cannot be the first, which would be two pounds ten, and written 2.10.
    It's over forty years since decimalisation in the UK, and I still occasionally think of two pounds ten as two pounds ten shillings (=2.50).

    Still, I am not alone. When I was staying in Paris, I heard a couple of stallholders calling out their prices in mille francs, the old franc which had disappeared over forty years before.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    Most cashiers and shop assistants would say "That's two oh one" please. We frequently omit the "pounds" and "pence" parts.

    That's 1.50 - That's one fifty.
    8.49 please - Eight forty-nine please.

    Theoretically, that could be confusing because, for example, "That's 150" can also be said as "That's one fifty". However, the listener is very likely to know whether they have spent 1.50 or 150 and, of course, most shop tills show the amount too.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    Quote Originally Posted by ademoglu View Post
    - Two pounds and one pence.
    Does it mean "2.1" or "2.01"?
    I think you're actually asking, 'Is two pounds and one pence written as "2.1" or "2.01?' or:
    'Does "2.1" or "2.01" mean two pounds and one pence." or better:
    'Which means "two pounds and one pence" - "2.1" or "2.01?'

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    #8

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    Actually 'pence' is a plural word. Like Piscean, I'd say 'two pounds and a/one penny' (have a look at the coin and see what it calls itself).

    However, so many of my compatriots say 'one pence' (including a Chancellor of the Exchequer in a budget speech), that I just have to suck it up.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 26-Aug-2015 at 09:26. Reason: Getting 'Piscean' right.

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    #9

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    I remember the arguments about saying 10-pee when we had decimalisation instead of saying the proper term- I was in primary school at the time. I am afraid that I have fallen on the one pence/ten pence side. Decimalisation won out on all the issues with the currency IMO.

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    #10

    Re: two pounds and one pence

    Gone are the days when we said and understood such forms as /heɪpni/, /tʌp(ə)ns/, /θrʊp(əns)/ and /sevm(ə)pns/, knew that 4d meant four pence' and that adding /tempns/ and /sixpns/ gave us one and four. An Oxo cube cost a penny farthing in my childhood.

    Money was more interesting then, with half-crown coins and ten-bob notes.

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