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    #1

    Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Is the above sentence natural?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Companies can incur losses, but I don't think incur overhead works.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    I agree.

    Company A has fewer overheads than Company B. (Use "fewer" if you're using a countable noun.)
    Company A's overheads are lower than Company B's. (Here, "overheads" suggests the actual amount of money involved.)
    Company A has lower overheads than Company B.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    I have never run across "overheads" in AmE. We normally use it as an uncountable noun.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I have never run across "overheads" in AmE. We normally use it as an uncountable noun.
    OK, but if you have never run across it, how can you use it as an uncountable noun?

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    We don't pluralize it and it is considered singular. What does uncountable mean to you?

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.
    Is it correct to use 'pays' instead of 'incurs'?

  7. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    We don't pluralize it and it is considered singular. What does uncountable mean to you?
    So the 'it' in post #4 referred to 'overhead', not to 'overheads'. But in that post you said you use it as an uncountable noun and here you are saying it is singular (which implies countability to me)

    I'd say "We have high overheads" and "Our overheads are high". How would you say these two sentences?

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I don't think incur overhead works.
    Does it work below?
    'The company will incur more overhead if it expands.'

  9. lotus888's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Company A incurs less overhead than Company B.

    Is the above sentence natural?

    We normally use it in the past tense.

    Company A incurred less overhead than Company B.

    In the present tense, we say:

    Company A has less overhead than Company B.



    --lotus

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