Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Junior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Argentina
      • Current Location:
      • Argentina

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 51
    #1

    more exciting

    I've read this sentence. The more exciting of the two books is.... Why not the most exciting?
    Thanks in advance.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,939
    #2

    Re: more exciting

    Because we use the comparative form with two things, the superlative with more than two.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: more exciting

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Ronao:

    A teacher has already given you the answer. If you follow the rule that he mentioned, you will please everyone, including your teachers.

    *****

    I am replying only because I want to let you know that some (many?) native speakers do NOT always follow that rule. Please do not be surprised by that fact when you read and hear English.

    1. One book * that is widely respected by learners and teachers says:

    a. "When a group only has two members, we sometimes [my emphasis] use the comparative instead of the superlative."

    i. His examples: "I like Betty and Maud, but I think Maud's the nicer/nicest of the two." [His emphasis]; "I'll give you the biggest/ bigger steak: I'm not hungry." (Mr. Swan is careful to say that some people feel that a superlative is "incorrect" in those sentences.)

    2. Another book ** says: "[T]he natural tendency in English is to use the superlative in speaking of two."

    a. His examples : "We'll see who is strongest, you or I" / "Put your best leg forward."

    b. The second book is "old." But in my opinion (opinion!), his comment is still true in 2015.

    Credit goes to: *Michael Swan, Practical English Usage (1995 edition), entry number (NOT page number) 138.2. / **Otto Jespersen, Essentials of English Grammar (1933), 1964 copyright by the University of Alabama Press, page 228.
    Last edited by TheParser; 29-Aug-2015 at 17:16.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,939
    #4

    Re: more exciting

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I am replying only because I want to let you know that some (many?) native speakers do NOT always follow that rule.
    I agree. However, learners need to know that some teachers and examiners insist on the rule. If you use the superlative form when you are talking of two people/things in normal conversation, hardly anyone will notice. If you use it in examinations in some countries, you may be penalised.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] Especially exciting
    By englishhobby in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-May-2012, 16:03
  2. an exciting place to be
    By jasonlulu_2000 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-May-2012, 17:54
  3. surprising, exciting, pleasing??
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18-Apr-2011, 01:10
  4. [Grammar] I"m exciting vs I'm excited
    By Chariseho in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Nov-2010, 03:28
  5. exciting technology clusters
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2008, 11:58

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •