Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 559
    #1

    the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    Dear all,

    "Bob is in a hurry to catch the next train, but as far as I'm concerned, there is no hurry at all."

    Do you use "as far as I'm concerned" to mean "as for me"? In many cases, the phrase seems to mean "in my opinion"", but that doesn't fit in the sentence above.

    Thank you!

    OP

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    It can mean "in my opinion" there.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,109
    #3

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    "Bob is in a hurry to catch the next train, but as far as I'm concerned, there is no hurry at all."

    This almost certainly means "in my opinion". I can see how you might think it could mean, "Bob is late, but I left half an hour ago, so I'm not in a hurry." The phrase "as far as I'm concerned" is unlikely to mean that, in my opinion.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,925
    #4

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    I would put the comma after "but".

    George is in a hurry to catch the train but, as far as I'm concerned, there is no hurry at all.

    It's quite wordy and I would expect, in natural everyday English, something like "George is rushing to catch the train but I don't think there's any need to rush".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #5

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Optimistic Pessimist:

    You probably already know this, but I just wanted to remind you that the expression "as far as I'm concerned" often has a negative meaning.

    Maybe (maybe) students should NOT use this expression until they understand the language very well.

    Mona: Have you heard about the Parser?
    Tony: What about him?
    Mona: He's in the hospital.
    Tony: As far as I'm concerned, he can stay there forever!

    Mona: There are two candidates for mayor of our city. Who do you hope wins?
    Tony: As far as I'm concerned, both of them should lose!

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    Is "as far as I'm concerned" the source of the negativity? Or is it the other text? In my opinion, "as far as I'm concerned" is a neutral phrase.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 574
    #7

    Re: the use of "as far as I'm concerned"

    I agree with Mike. It depends how the phrase is used. The Parser is right that it is often used negatively, but if it is used per the OP's sentence then the only source of negativity is the fact that the speaker is disagreeing with Bob's need to hurry.

    However, it can be also used positively:

    Anita: I really like Cheddar cheese, do you?
    Barbara: As far as I'm concerned it's the best there is.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] What do "to feature" and "be concerned by" mean here?
    By azhu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Jul-2013, 09:27
  2. "to concern" and "to be concerned with"
    By Pierce111 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jul-2013, 20:26
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Jun-2012, 20:05
  4. "she was genuinely concerned"
    By TheShadow in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2012, 23:18
  5. "concerns him" vs "he's concerned about"
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Apr-2008, 18:49

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •