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    #1

    the usage of "do up"

    Do up means fasten.
    An examples is:
    "a shirt so tight that not all of the buttons did up" this comes in google meaning search (meaning: do up)

    One of my colleagues in an English-learning-group come up with the following example:
    Please do up your coat otherwise you'll get cold.
    She thinks "do up" could mean "put on" as well.

    Although I think "do up" doesn't mean put on, but her example could be correct as she wants to say
    Wrap up yourself with your coat to protect your body from cold.

    Is my interpretation correct?

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    Quote Originally Posted by yabi View Post
    "Do up" means "fasten."
    An example is:
    "a shirt so tight that not all of the buttons did up"
    This comes in came from a Google meaning search. (meaning: do up)

    One of my colleagues in an English learning group came up with the following example:
    Please do up your coat; otherwise you'll get cold.
    She thinks "do up" could mean "put on" as well.

    Although I think "do up" doesn't mean "put on", but her example could be correct as she wants to say: "Wrap up yourself up with your coat to protect your body from the cold."

    Is my interpretation correct?
    No, I'm afraid it isn't. The meaning of "do up" does not include "put on."

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    "Do up" means to button the buttons or zip up the zipper. The coat must already be on.

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    #4

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    Not A Teacher

    Teechar and MikeNewYork are correct about "Do up" in the context described, it also has other meanings in BrE.
    "Do up" can mean to repair or decorate something, for example an old car or a room in a house.
    It can also mean to wrap a present.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    I agree with all of the above apart from the "to wrap a present" definition. Maybe it's a regional variant but I have only ever used or heard "to wrap a present". I might "do up" the string or the ribbon which goes round the present but that would be after it had been wrapped in wrapping paper.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    Dear all

    Thanks to all.
    All answers are informative and I learned a lot.
    I will convey them to my colleague.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    You could also encourage your colleague to join this forum so that he can ask his own questions.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree with all of the above apart from the "to wrap a present" definition. Maybe it's a regional variant but I have only ever used or heard "to wrap a present". I might "do up" the string or the ribbon which goes round the present but that would be after it had been wrapped in wrapping paper.
    You are probably correct it may well be a regional variation but cannot always tell from where. I have a fairly mixed set of influences in my vocabulary from branches of the family in Southern England, the North East and Scotland and will mix them all together.
    Last edited by Mrfatso; 01-Sep-2015 at 13:26.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    I sometimes use "do up" in relation to wrapping up a present. Because you can also use sticky tape to "do them up" and secure the wrapping paper. I would be happy with either "wrap" or "do up".

    My vocabulary is mostly from Southern, and North West, England.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: the usage of "do up"

    AmE also uses the fix/repair/decorate definition of 'do up'. A gift could also be 'done up' in AmE.

    We sometimes refer to somebody who is dressed fancily as 'done up'.

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