Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Sep 2015
    • Posts: 35
    #1

    A long row to hoe

    1) a long row to hoe
    2) a tough row to hoe
    3) a hard row to hoe

    Do these idoms have the same meaning? Which one do you use in your daily life? Does it make difference in USA and in Britain?
    Last edited by Turkish is the best; 06-Sep-2015 at 18:26.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 958
    #2

    Re: A long row to hoe

    Probably there are regional differences. They all have the same meaning.

    Where I come from (Midwest USA), I most heard #2.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: A long row to hoe

    That was my experience in the Midwest USA also.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,453
    #4

    Re: A long row to hoe

    Click here for a rough guide to the comparative usages of these idioms. You'll see that there's not a lot of difference between them.

    Change the corpus search to American English and then British English. There's little difference there also.

    (Write USA — not Usa.)

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #5

    Re: A long row to hoe

    I've never heard any of them in BrE. Having looked at the Ngram, it's clear that the usage of all three had fallen considerably by the time I was born so that might explain it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 173
    #6

    Re: A long row to hoe

    Originally posted by Rover_KE:
    (Write USA — not Usa.)
    Not A Teacher

    Usa is a city in Japan.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-Sep-2015 at 08:33. Reason: Added relevant quote to explain contents of post

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,453
    #7

    Re: A long row to hoe

    I did not know that. I can't say which of those phrases the Usans use.

  3. Eckaslike's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 574
    #8

    Re: A long row to hoe

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I've never heard any of them in BrE. Having looked at the Ngram, it's clear that the usage of all three had fallen considerably by the time I was born so that might explain it.
    That must be the reason ems. I grew up in the West Country, with farming and gardening all around me, and I've never heard it used wherever I've lived in various parts of southern England or south Wales.

    [Update: It appears that it is mainly an AmE expression. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...#translations]
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 06-Sep-2015 at 20:16. Reason: To add an update.

Similar Threads

  1. What/Hoe does it taste?
    By Yourjones in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-Apr-2015, 08:06
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2014, 05:39
  3. On the front / back row In the first/ second/fifth row
    By englishhobby in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-Mar-2014, 22:47
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-Jul-2012, 13:52
  5. Row Row Row your boat....."Life is but a dream" ???
    By EngFan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-Jul-2012, 09:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •