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    #1

    Miss / Missing

    Hi

    Can you explain the difference between these two sentences? And when should we use which?

    I'm missing my friends.
    I miss my friends.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Miss / Missing

    They have similar meanings for me. I think the second is more common.

  2. lotus888's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Miss / Missing

    The second one is better. The first one might mean you've lost your friends.



    --lotus

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Miss / Missing

    "Lost" could mean you can't find them or your friendship has ended.

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    #5

    Re: Miss / Missing

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,

    You have already received the answer. I just wanted to share some ideas.

    1. If a person is not yet fluent in the language, then it would probably be a good idea to simply say, "I (really) miss my friends."

    2. As you know, the present progressive is not usually used with certain verbs.

    a. But it seems that native speakers have no problem (at least in conversational American English) if your meaning is "more and more."

    i. When my friends left, I told myself that it wasn't important. But after a few months, I find that I am (really) missing my friends [more and more every day].

    3. You have probably heard that slogan of a certain famous restaurant chain: "I'm lovin' [loving] it." That seems to give an idea of something like: The more and more that I go to this restaurant chain, the more I fall in love with its delicious hamburgers, french fries, and milkshakes. "I love it" does not seem to give the idea of gradually developing a love.

    4. One more example: When I first met the Parser, I did not like him. But I find that recently I am liking him a lot. (= Starting to like him a lot.)

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Miss / Missing

    3. I think the meaning here is one of "loving" the food at that time. I am eating the burger and I am loving it. The same would apply to someone who is in a movie theater and saying "I am loving this movie".

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