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    #1

    queue up VS line up

    Please line up for buying Mcdonald.
    Please queue up for buying Mcdonald.

    Which one is more common in an English country?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: queue up VS line up

    We rarely use "queue" in the USA.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I think people buy food at McDonald's instead of 'buying Mcdonald', but I am not a teacher.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: queue up VS line up

    That's true, Matthew.

  4. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    We rarely use "queue" in the USA.
    We love to "queue" in the UK, and rarely "line up".

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    #6

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I would use to buy McDonald's, not for buying.

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    #7

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think people buy food at McDonald's instead of 'buying Mcdonald', but I am not a teacher.
    That's OK, but buy (a) MacDonald's works for me.

  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: queue up VS line up

    To demonstrate how rarely 'queue' is used in AmE, I remember having to look it up in a dictionary the first time I ever saw it. I had no idea what it meant.

    About the only time I see it in AmE is related to computers - for examples, documents pending in the printing queue.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Yes, that's odd, given that most terminology comes out of America. You also have queues as abstract data types.

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    #10

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I was going to make a similar comment about "print queues."

    I have seen people in my company talk about pending work in their "que."

    I think we Americans are so used to stripping off "-ue" from words (catalog, dialog, etc.) that they don't know when to stop!

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