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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    queue up VS line up

    Please line up for buying Mcdonald.
    Please queue up for buying Mcdonald.

    Which one is more common in an English country?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: queue up VS line up

    We rarely use "queue" in the USA.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I think people buy food at McDonald's instead of 'buying Mcdonald', but I am not a teacher.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: queue up VS line up

    That's true, Matthew.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    We rarely use "queue" in the USA.
    We love to "queue" in the UK, and rarely "line up".

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #6

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I would use to buy McDonald's, not for buying.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #7

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think people buy food at McDonald's instead of 'buying Mcdonald', but I am not a teacher.
    That's OK, but buy (a) MacDonald's works for me.

  8. Skrej's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: queue up VS line up

    To demonstrate how rarely 'queue' is used in AmE, I remember having to look it up in a dictionary the first time I ever saw it. I had no idea what it meant.

    About the only time I see it in AmE is related to computers - for examples, documents pending in the printing queue.

  9. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: queue up VS line up

    Yes, that's odd, given that most terminology comes out of America. You also have queues as abstract data types.

  10. VIP Member
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    #10

    Re: queue up VS line up

    I was going to make a similar comment about "print queues."

    I have seen people in my company talk about pending work in their "que."

    I think we Americans are so used to stripping off "-ue" from words (catalog, dialog, etc.) that they don't know when to stop!

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