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    #1

    be after subject

    Hi,


    I couldn't remember any sentence but I do remember that sometimes "be" is used soon after the subject. Can you please explain when one should use it?

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: be after subject

    I want to be rich.

    The word 'be' is the third word after the subject. Is that what you were thinking of?

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: be after subject

    I think 'be' is the second word after the subject in 'I will be rich', but I am not a teacher.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think 'be' is the second word after the subject in 'I will be rich', but I am not a teacher.
    I don't think you need to state that you are not a teacher when you state something that is obviously true.

  4. engee30's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by Untaught88 View Post
    Hi,


    I couldn't remember any sentence but I do remember that sometimes "be" is used soon after the subject. Can you please explain when one should use it?
    You must have seen examples with past subjunctives, as in:
    If he be found not guilty, the victim will definitely feel unsafe for their life.

    Such use sounds very stiff, so it's best to avoid it in everyday speech and use the indicative:
    If he is found not guilty, the victim will definitely feel unsafe for their life.

  5. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    You must have seen examples with past subjunctives, as in:
    If he be found not guilty, the victim will definitely feel unsafe for their life.
    'Be' is a present subjunctive form. The past subjunctive form of the verb is 'were'.

  6. engee30's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: be after subject

    I stand corrected.

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    If he be found not guilty, the victim will definitely feel unsafe for their life.
    I doubt it is correct to use the present subjunctive in an if-clause, but I am not a teacher.
    I think the present subjunctive should be used in a sentence like 'It is desirable that he be found guilty'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I don't think you need to state that you are not a teacher when you state something that is obviously true.
    I think it is safe to state it whether it is necessary or not, and I have already got used to it. I hope you don't mind.
    Also, what a learner considers true might be considered false by a teacher.

  8. engee30's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I doubt it is correct to use the present subjunctive in an if-clause, but I am not a teacher.
    I think the present subjunctive should be used in a sentence like 'It is desirable that he be found guilty'.
    Be assured, Matthew, that it is correct, but extremely rare to find these days.
    Your sentence is another fine example of a present subjunctive form used in the clause.

  9. Piscean's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: be after subject

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I
    I think the present subjunctive should be used in a sentence like 'It is desirable that he be found guilty'.
    As engee has said, that is correct. However, the indicative in that sentence would be far more common in BrE these days.

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