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  1. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #1

    Parsing.

    Is my parsing correct?

    "He persuaded her not to go."

    He - the subject;

    persuaded - the predicator (the verb);

    her - the indirect object;

    not to go - the direct object (a non-finite infinitive clause).

    Thank you.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Parsing.

    No, 'her' is the direct object.

  3. lotus888's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Parsing.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkacka15 View Post
    Is my parsing correct?

    "He persuaded her not to go."

    He - the subject;

    persuaded - the predicator (the verb);

    her - the indirect object;

    not to go - the direct object (a non-finite infinitive clause).

    Thank you.
    The reason why you think "her" is an indirect object is because "persuade" is actually acting as a causative verb.

    He persuaded her (not) to go. For now, let's exclude "not".

    He persuaded her to go. The "persuasion" is what caused her to go.

    CAUSE + PERSON + TO + VERB
    PERSUADE + PERSON + TO + VERB

    In this case, the person is the agent for the action.

    He made her puke. He didn't puke. She's the one who puked. He caused her to puke.

    She is not the object of made. She is simply an agent of the verb puke (it happened to her).

    The way I see it, the PERSON is neither a direct nor indirect object -- she is simply an agent.

    http://www.espressoenglish.net/causa...have-get-help/

    http://www.myenglishpages.com/site_p...ative-verb.php



    --lotus

  4. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Parsing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No, 'her' is the direct object.
    Thank you, Raymott, for your reply.

    I understand it this way:

    He persuaded [what] not to go into [whom] her.

    Is my understanding of it right?
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

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    #5

    Re: Parsing.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Tkacka:

    I have good news and bad news for you.

    The bad news is that there appear to be several "correct" ways to interpret your sentence -- depending on which book you are using.

    The good news is that one huge book respected by scholars throughout the world * agrees with you that "her" is an indirect object. Let me cite a few of its points:

    1. "I told/advised/persuaded Mark to see a doctor."

    a. The book says that "the noun phrase [Mark] is an indirect object, ... the indirect object refers to the addressee ["Mark"]."

    b. The book then gives this passive sentence [as "proof"?]: Mark was told/advised/ persuaded to see a doctor."

    c. The book reminds us that we cannot say "To see a doctor was told [/persuaded] Mark."


    As I said, the analysis depends on the book that you use.

    I, of course, shall keep my opinion to myself, and I shall never gainsay anything that a teacher tells you. I just thought, however, that it would OK to let you know that there are several ways to parse your sentence.


    *Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, Svartvik, A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985 edition), page 1215.

    P.S. To make the situation more fun, look at this sentence from a reputable book:

    "The dean requested me to report at once [to his office?]." (My emphasis)

    a. The two scholars claim that "me to report at once" is the direct object of the verb (and "me" is the subject of the infinitive).

    b. I guess that the "huge" book would disagree, for it says that "request" is to be analyzed in the same way that "persuade" is.

    Pence and Emery, A Grammar of Present-Day English (1947 and 1963), page 70.
    Last edited by TheParser; 15-Sep-2015 at 13:47.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Parsing.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkacka15 View Post
    not to go - the direct object (a non-finite infinitive clause).
    I think 'not to go' is a to-infinitive acting as an adjective modifying 'her', but I am not a teacher.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Parsing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think 'not to go' is a to-infinitive acting as an adjective modifying 'her', but I am not a teacher.
    I don't think so.

  7. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Parsing.

    Thank you, The Parser, for your detailed and interesting replay.


    "I just thought, however, that it would OK to let you know that there are several ways to parse your sentence."

    Yes, I couldn't agree more.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Parsing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I don't think so.
    Then what do you think 'not to go' modifies?

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Parsing.

    I agree with Parser. These seemingly simple constructions are difficult to analyze. One of of the most perplexing sentences comes from a children's book. "See Spot run". The best analysis that I have seen has "Spot" as the indirect object.

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