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    #1

    starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Tense

    Hello everybody!

    I would like you to tell me if my reasoning is right.

    STARTING POINT

    Since I started jogging at least twice a week 3 years ago, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.
    (The bolded phrase in the Simple Past Tense means the starting point).

    DURATION
    Since I have been jogging at least twice a week for 3 years now, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.
    (The bolded phrase in the Present Perfect Continuous Tense means the duration).

    Both the examples are about time, not reason.

    What do you think?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 15-Sep-2015 at 18:34. Reason: Reducing font size.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Ten

    I think 'since' in the second sentence means 'because', but I am not a teacher.
    'Because I have been jogging at least twice a week for three years, I have not caught a cold for a long time.'

  2. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Ten

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello everybody!

    I would like you to tell me if my reasoning is right.

    STARTING POINT

    Since I started jogging at least twice a week 3 years ago, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.
    (The bolded phrase in the Simple Past Tense means the starting point).

    DURATION
    Since I have been jogging at least twice a week for 3 years now, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.
    (The bolded phrase in the Present Perfect Continuous Tense means the duration).

    Both the examples are about time, not reason.

    What do you think?

    Thank you.
    Hi Jacek.

    In my opinion "since" in both sentences is a conjunction meaning "as"/"because"; I don't see it as a marker of the starting point or duration. (I'm interested in the native speakers' opinions about that.)
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Ten

    That's a big problem with the word "since".

  4. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Ten

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That's a big problem with the word "since".
    I see both sentences used in the cause-and-effect pattern.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: starting point versus duraation after "since" in Present Perfect (Continuous) Ten

    Quote Originally Posted by tkacka15 View Post
    Hi Jacek.

    In my opinion "since" in both sentences is a conjunction meaning "as"/"because"; I don't see it as a marker of the starting point or duration. (I'm interested in the native speakers' opinions about that.)

    Hi tkacka15,

    (Because the two sentences are so alike I have referred to them as one sentence in my explanation below to try to keep it simple).

    My natural feeling derived from the word "since" is not "as/because" here, although that is a logical conclusion to derive from the meaning of the sentence as a whole. What I mean is that a conclusion is being made about the sentence first and then a substitute word "as or because" is being inserted and works because that is another meaning of since [hence Mike's comment]. However, in the context of this sentence those words do not convey the same meaning as the word "since". Here it is being used as a word concerning time rather than logic.
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us.../english/since (meaning no. 1., not meaning no. 2.)

    In simple terms I see "since" in this sentence as meaning "after", in the sense of "after the point at which", and so it has a time meaning in the form of a time marker which is used to introduce the "duration of a period" that follows in a sentence. The duration in the example sentence is 3 years ago until now.

    "Since I started jogging at least twice a week 3 years ago, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.".

    "After [the point at which] I started jogging at least twice a week 3 years ago, I have not caught a cold /I have felt much better.".

    Since (= the start point in the past) ---> 1yr ---> 2yrs ---> 3yrs(now).
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 15-Sep-2015 at 23:20.

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