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  1. #1
    Adriana2015 is offline Newbie
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    Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    Hello - I am trying to understand the meaning of the slang word 'jammed up' in the following sentence:

    Apologies for missing the baptism. I am just jammed up here. I have to go back to hospital to be there for my mother.

  2. #2
    Mrfatso is offline Member
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    Not A Teacher

    'Jammed up' here means too busy to do anything else

    Apologies for missing the baptism.I am just too busy up here. I have to go back to hospital to be there for my mother.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    The person has so many things going on that they cannot do them all, so they had to sacrifice going to the baptism in order to visit their mother.

  4. #4
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    Skrej is offline Key Member
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    It's an indirect reference to a log jam - where logs being harvested for timber are floated down river to the sawmill.

    Occasionally, instead of all floating downriver in the same direction, some will get turned around or caught on something, causing a pile (jam) that prevents the logs behind them from flowing downriver.

    In this case, instead of logs jamming up, it's the failure to complete one activity that has created a jam of his other intended activities.
    Last edited by Skrej; 21-Sep-2015 at 20:26. Reason: typo :(

  5. #5
    ESL Team is offline Newbie
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    Maybe this will help you understand the meaning of jam better.
    Another similar term we hear sometimes is 'to be in a jam'.
    It is related to the idea of being jammed up.
    To be in a jam means to be in a difficult position or situation.
    It can be about money, trouble, relationships, time or other things.
    Think about a traffic jam, a time jam, to be in a jam and being jammed up as having some related meanings.
    I hope that Helps ~ Luke
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Mar-2016 at 09:48.

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    Welcome to the forum.
    Quote Originally Posted by ESL Team View Post
    Maybe this will help you understand the meaning of 'jam' better.
    Another similar term we hear sometimes is 'to be in a jam'.
    It is related to the idea of being jammed up.
    'To be in a jam' means to be in a difficult position or situation.
    It can be about money, trouble, relationships, time or other things.
    Think about a traffic jam, a time jam, to be in a jam and being jammed up as having some related meanings.
    I hope that helps.
    Luke
    Please note my corrections to your post.

  7. #7
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    Other similar expressions include:

    - swamped
    - slammed
    - plowed under
    - under the gun
    - down to the wire
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. #8
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    Re: Slang phrase 'Jammed Up' as an adjective

    I've never heard "plowed under" (which in BrE would be "ploughed under") but we use "snowed under".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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