Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,831
    #1

    None of them native speakers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I sometimes remind members that the list of distinguished grammarians who have helped our understanding of the way English works includes, in the last hundred years, such highly respected grammarians as Christophersen, Declerck, Jespersen, Kruisinga, Poutsma, Sandved, Zandvoort (and many others), none of them native speakers.
    Can anyone explain why a linking verb can be omitted after 'them'?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #2

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    It's quite normal, "being" is understood.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #3

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    As bhaisahab said, "being" or some form of "to be" is implied.

    I have six cats, none of them white.
    I own four pairs of jeans, none of them purple.
    There are five people over there, none of them happy.
    He has had a dozen experiences of eating at that restaurant, none of them good.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Mr. Wai:

    You have already received the answer. I only wanted to share some ideas, for I was absolutely fascinated by your question.

    I have made up this sentence: "Mona has five boyfriends, none of them English speakers."

    I think (think) that this sentence could also be written as:

    "Mona has five boyfriends -- none of them English speakers" or even "Mona has five boyfriends (none of them English speakers)."

    I am trying (very badly, as usual) to make two points:

    1. In speech, there might be a pause after "boyfriends."
    2. "None of them English speakers" seems to be an afterthought. That is to say, almost parenthetical. (That is, a thought just thrown in to give some added information.)

    a. My biggest point, then, is maybe (maybe!) the missing word in my example is "is/are":

    "Mona has five boyfriends -- none of them (is/are) English speakers."


    Compare:

    "None of them (being) native speakers, they did not understand the idiom." (I believe that "everyone" would agree that "being" is the only answer, for the words in front of the comma constitute a so-called nominative absolute. I believe that it means something like "Because ...." In my example, however, it is not adverbial. "None of them (is/are) English speakers" seems to be a noun clause.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,831
    #5

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    Is it also normal to have omitted 'being' after them below?
    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I will quote you fifty more if you wish, all of them present or past holders of university chairs in departments of English and/or Linguistics.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    Yes, it is.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #7

    Re: None of them native speakers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Is it also normal to have omitted 'being' after them below?
    It strikes me as more normal without it than with it.

Similar Threads

  1. non-native speakers & Native speakers
    By Karima-19 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-May-2011, 22:03
  2. native speakers
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jun-2010, 17:28
  3. Do non-native speakers outnumber native ones
    By stefan_kar in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-May-2009, 15:26
  4. How non-native speakers reach native level of English?
    By thedaffodils in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2009, 10:30
  5. [General] Need help from native speakers
    By HUFS1999 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Nov-2008, 09:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •