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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #1

    It'll be a snack.

    When I was looking up the word "snack" here, I found 'It'll be a snack' in definition #2. It says "(Australian English, informal)". I think it means the same as 'It'll be a piece of cake'.

    Is 'a snack' used in this way in BrE and AmE as well?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    It's not in BrE. I have heard 'It'll be a snap', but that's not common.

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    #3

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    Not AmE either. I didn't find this usage elsewhere in a quick search. I'd want a strong endorsement from a native Australian before I accepted it or tried to use it.

    Idioms can be extremely local, and sometimes people will make a joke out of successfully inserting a false internet reference. You should never trust a single source.

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    #4

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    "It's a snap" is an idiom. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/It's+a+snap

    Snack is food
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    You should never trust a single source.
    The definition also appears here: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dic.../english/snack

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    I found these at http://corpus.byu.edu/glowbe/:

    If Monckton is so lacking in knowledge then it should be a snack to whip him in an open, unbiased, mediated showdown... way you came on even the widest of streets, so reverse parking is a snack.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    Strange use.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    I've certainly never heard it in BrE. I have heard "It's a snap" but not frequently.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    not a teacher

    As well as Piscean's Collins link, "It'll be a snack" is defined in its informal Australian sense here: http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...nglish/snack_1
    "Snack" is also listed in Partridge's "Slang and Unconventional English" with this meaning, dating from the 1920s. Partridge says that it's related to Australian swindler's slang for a certainty, a dupe or easy mark.
    I've lived in Australia on and off for many years, mostly in Melbourne, and never heard this usage, and I've just spoken to a sixty-year-old Australian who says that she's never heard it either.
    The "Monckton" quote that Piscean gives us is from a discussion relating to an issue in Western Australia. Perhaps the usage is more common there.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: It'll be a snack.

    I have never heard this usage, during almost 60 years, mostly in Queensland.

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