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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    something from you which reminds me of

    Hi,

    Literal translation from my language would be:
    ''I want to keep with me a symbol from you which reminds me of you.''
    But I am sure it is incorrect.
    So how about the following one?
    ''I want to keep with me something from you which reminds me of you.''
    Can you please come up with a better version?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: something from you which reminds me of

    Remove "from you" and you have a perfectly good sentence.

    I want to keep something which reminds me of you.

    However, if it's important that the "something" actually belonged to the other person, you can say "I want to keep something of yours to remind me of you".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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