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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    to go into a building

    Hello,
    Can we say: "A huge truck hit my friend's bike and it (the bike) went into the book shop nearby"? By "went into" I don't mean that it crashed through a brick wall or whatsoever. It ended up inside the building after it crashed through a window,door, etc.

    Is it impossible to say that? Thank you

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    #2

    Re: to go into a building

    It sounds odd to me, but I wouldn't say it is completely impossible- more unlikely. Crashed into would work much better.

  2. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: to go into a building

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It sounds odd to me, but I wouldn't say it is completely impossible- more unlikely. Crashed into would work much better.
    Thank you. I think that "it crashed into the book shop nearby" could be a little ambiguous, can't it? What if the bike ends up inside the store? Would it be more acceptable to say: "A huge truck hit my friend's bike and it landed inside the book store" or maybe even "A huge truck hit my friend's bike and it flew into the book store"? I know that using "end up" fits this sentence neatly, but I am trying to think of an alternative.

    I hope you don't mind my questions ;)

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    #4

    Re: to go into a building

    Consider this:

    'A huge truck hit my friend's bike and knocked it through the window of a bookshop'.

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    #5

    Re: to go into a building

    Quote Originally Posted by Hornviper View Post
    Thank you. I think that "it crashed into the book shop nearby" could be a little ambiguous, can't it? What if the bike ends up inside the store? Would it be more acceptable to say: "A huge truck hit my friend's bike and it landed inside the book store" or maybe even "A huge truck hit my friend's bike and it flew into the book store"? I know that using "end up" fits this sentence neatly, but I am trying to think of an alternative.

    I hope you don't mind my questions ;)
    crashed into the book shop nearby would be acceptable, you don't generally have to be so precise with what happened to the bike, though you could say the bike crashed through the book shop window/door, doing so would explain what exactly happened.

    I hope this has helped you.

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