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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    I have two sentences to make a comparison:
    1. She stood at the bus station, waiting for his mother. (waiting for his mother here functions as a concomitant adverbial.)
    2. She stood at the bus station, to wait for his mother. (to wait for his mother here works as a adverbial of purpose.)
    Am I right? In 2, is the comma needed?
    Thanks a lot to you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    I have never heard of a "concomitant adverbial".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I have never heard of a "concomitant adverbial".
    I'm glad I'm not the only one!

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I have never heard of a "concomitant adverbial".
    You should be ashamed of yourself. A concomitant adverbial is an adverbial that is ... um ...err... concomitant.

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    #5

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I have never heard of a "concomitant adverbial".
    I would like replace the "concomitant adverbial" with "time adverbial". If I do so, could you please tell me whether my sentences and analyses correct?

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    I think 'waiting for his mother' is a participle phrase acting as an adjective modifying 'She', but I am not a teacher.

  7. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    May I add my two cents here?

    Please look at the two sentences below.

    1. He stood at the bus station, waiting for his mother.
    2. He stood at the bus station impatiently.

    The participle clause/phrase "waiting for his mother" in #1 functions like "impatiently" in #2.
    In other words, it functions adverbially.



    (Edit) ... or if it were "He stood waiting for his mother at the bus station", the present participle in bold might probably be interpreted as a subject complement.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 24-Sep-2015 at 12:14.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    1. He stood at the bus station, waiting for his mother.
    2. He stood at the bus station wearing a coat.

    I think 'waiting for his mother' modifies 'He' as 'wearing a coat' does, so they function as an adjective, but I am not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by xxwzs View Post
    1. She stood at the bus station, waiting for his mother. (waiting for his mother here functions as a concomitant adverbial.)


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Of course, I cannot answer the OP's question.

    I have, however, found some information that has helped me to understand the matter a little bit, and I am delighted to share it.

    1. "Concomitant" = occurring concurrently; accompanying. (THE AMERICAN HERITAGE DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 1969.)

    2. "As an adverb, a participal is sometimes used to limit a verb (by denoting concomitant acts)." [my emphases] (Rand McNally English Grammar, 1898, accessed through Google.)

    a. "The mighty rocks come bounding down."
    b. "Now the bright star, day's harbinger / Comes dancing from the East." (Milton)

    3. Above all, another source helped me to advance a bit in understanding the term "concomitant adverbial."

    a. "The phrase which mentions Elisha's seeing is a circumstantial clause, which in this form (where the verb is participial) is used in Hebrew to depict concomitant rather than sequential action; hence my preferred rendering 'While Elisha ....' " [my emphases] (PROPHECY AND DISCERNMENT by R.W.L. Moberly (2006), a Google result.

    4. I may be totally wrong (as usual), but I have a sneaking suspicion that "concomitant adverbial" might be a more elegant term for what some textbooks call an adverbial element indicating accompanying circumstances.

    a. "He rambled on foot through France, playing a flute for a supper and a bed."
    b. ""Then he went to Leyden, still pretending to study medicine.

    [my emphases] (Walter Kay Smart, ENGLISH REVIEW GRAMMAR, copyright 1940 - 1968.)
    Last edited by TheParser; 24-Sep-2015 at 12:46.

  9. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "concomitant adverbial" or "adverbial of purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    1. He stood at the bus station, waiting for his mother.
    2. He stood at the bus station wearing a coat.

    I think 'waiting for his mother' modifies 'He' as 'wearing a coat' does, so they function as an adjective, but I am not a teacher.
    I think you should put a comma before wearing.
    Your sentence sounds to me as if the station were wearing a coat.
    "With a/his coat on" (instead of wearing a coat, of course,) might be more natural.

    Last edited by tzfujimino; 24-Sep-2015 at 15:01.

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