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    #1

    with Christmas

    Are any of these correct:

    1) Did you hear what he did with Christmas? He first invited me to his place and then disinvited me.

    2) Did you hear what he did for Christmas? He first invited me to his place and then disinvited me.
    3) Did you hear what he did in relation to Christmas? He first invited me to his place and then disinvited me.
    4) Did you hear what he did on Christmas? He first invited me to his place and then disinvited me.

    I suppose '3' is highly formal, but is it grammatically correct?
    The first two do not really sound correct to me, but maybe people might use them in everyday conversation.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: with Christmas

    They are all grammatical and understandable.

    I wouldn't use any of them. I would use "at Christmas time".

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    #3

    Re: with Christmas

    Each has as slightly different meaning.
    1. He used Christmas as a sort of tool to insult you.
    2. This was what he did for fun.
    3. Very unnatural.
    4. This would be okay if it all happened on Christmas Day, though it's highly unlikely he could/would do both things in one day.

    Mike is right in suggesting at Christmas, meaning any time during the Christmas Season, roughly from after Thanksgiving to before New Year's Eve.

  2. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: with Christmas

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    Mike is right in suggesting at Christmas, meaning any time during the Christmas Season, roughly from after Thanksgiving to before New Year's Eve.
    This BrE speaker completely agrees with J&K Tutoring. However, in the UK we don't have Thanksgiving, so our Christmas season traditionally runs from the first of December through to January the 5th, which is Twelfth Night.

    Advent Calendars* cover the 24 days from the first through to the twenty-fourth of December, and the Twelve Days of Christmas cover the period until Twelfth Night. That is why we have the song "The Twelve Days of Christmas".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-cjK3f87jI

    A long time ago, Twelfth Night used to be a big celebration in its own right, and Shakespeare used it as the title of one of his most famous plays.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelfth_Night


    *Advent Calendars have windows numbered one to twenty-four, to cover the period from the first to the twenty-fourth of December. One window is opened on each of the corresponding days, behind which there is usually a picture, or nowadays often a sweet.
    1. Traditional: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Ad...Bx4kUOW4-1M%3A

    2. Modern:
    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Ad...FtKzSeIrcFM%3A
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 26-Sep-2015 at 09:25.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: with Christmas

    Quote Originally Posted by Eckaslike View Post
    However, in the UK we don't have Thanksgiving, so our Christmas season traditionally runs from the first of December through to January the 5th, which is Twelfth Night.
    Unless you work in retail when Christmas starts just about now! I have already seen the large boxes of Christmas chocolates on sale in a couple of supermarkets, several are clearing an aisle ready for Christmas goods and the manager at the shop I work at part-time has just ordered the first delivery of Christmas puddings, advent calendars and Christmas chocolate. Sigh.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: with Christmas

    Yes, once the new school year starts in September everything to do with "back to school" is turfed out, and it's in with all the Christmas products!

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: with Christmas

    Once upon a time, shops had the decency to get Hallowe'en (October 31st) and Guy Fawkes' Night (aka Bonfire Night aka Firework Night) (November 5th) out of the way before launching into the Christmas products. Not any more!

    Regarding the original question, it might depend on whether the speaker is referring to last Christmas or Christmas 2015. If it's last Christmas, I would use exactly that: "Did you hear what he did to me last Christmas? He invited me [to his place] and then uninvited me!" If it refers to this/next Christmas, I would probably say "Did you hear what he's done to me about Christmas? He invited me [to his place] and then uninvited me!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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