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  1. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #1

    The Somerset Dialect

    As a follow-up to the recent, very interesting, post on the Yorkshire dialect, I found this one on the Somerset dialect.

    I grew up a few miles from the Mendip Hills, where the speaker was from, and can confirm that it most definitely is the accent of that area [starting at 0.24 in the video]. I remember a few local dairy farmers speaking like this. It would be very interesting to hear what you think, and how much of it you can understand!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsB90aJ6Jp8
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 25-Sep-2015 at 16:55.

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    To me, he sometimes sounds like an AmE speaker.
    Most of his English is incomprehensible to me.

  3. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    Firstly, do not feel embarrassed at all. It is not standard BrE, and the speaker is using a strong version of the dialect.

    I won't comment on anything else just yet, in case anyone else wants to contribute.
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 25-Sep-2015 at 19:32.

  4. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    Try this recording.....it's much clearer than that old record in the first link.

    You need these three videos, which are the read passages on the record in the first post (or you can just let it auto-run on to the next video after the end of the first).:

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mkzx...81tCbR8YNuCF9S

    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWO_...NuCF9S&index=9

    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LoR...81tCbR8YNuCF9S
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 25-Sep-2015 at 20:12.

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    #5

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    Quote Originally Posted by Eckaslike View Post
    the speaker is using a strong version of the dialect.
    That's quite a bit stronger that I have encountered as a tourist in the area.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    That's quite a bit stronger that I have encountered as a tourist in the area.
    It is the old accent of the area, but he uses far more dialect words than I ever remember hearing at all once. Apparently the recording is from the 1930s. The accent remains now, but much of the dialect has disappeared.

    People in the tourist areas need to be understood by visitors, so they would probably never have spoken like that.

    The dairy farmers and other local long established families dealt with one another more, and so reinforced the accent among themselves.

    I'm going to try and transcribe the recordings, but to be honest I found the first one very hard to understand in places, especially the bit where he says "catlin', weezlin', dunchwald mummet", which as far as I can make out seems to be a string of mild expletives!
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 26-Sep-2015 at 21:40.

  6. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The Somerset Dialect

    Here's my translation of the first recording. I've transcribed the original in black type and translated it into standard English in blue underneath each line. That way you can listen to the recording while reading and understand what's being said!

    Standard Passage:
    There sawus! I were right about thik adder also. Thik little maid was coming from school yonder long out of the stall. Ah, there she be goin down
    There you see! I was right about that youngster too. That little girl was coming home from school over there, along out of the cowshed. Ah, there she is, going down

    long through the red gate, down the left hand side of the road.
    along through the red gate, down the left hand side of the road.

    Lookzee; if another'n maid had'n been un gone up the door of wrong house. Foolish maid, whatever be ee thinking on.
    Look now; if another girl hasn't gone up to the door of the wrong house. Silly girl, whatever are you thinking about.
    (The reader has altered this part of the standard passage, and now it doesn't make sense. The standard passage in the other dialects just talks about one girl throughout, which works far better).


    The very place wher she'm like to fall in with thik cattlin, weezlin, dunch-wold mummet. We der all know un pretty well don'us. Go by the name of
    The very place where she's likely to meet that grumpy, shrivelled, deaf old chap. We [do] all know him pretty well don't we. Goes by the name of

    Thomas don'er?
    Thomas, doesn't he?

    Well ee can't abide childer. I looked the rest beside the wold varmint's tang'll zoon larn she not never to do it no more.
    Well he can't stand children. I bet the old ratbag's tongue will soon teach her never to do it again.

    I warrant ee be a diamond ee be.
    He's a real diamond he is. ("Diamond" used ironically: Like sarcastically saying "he's a charmer", in this instance more like "he's a character").

    There now, di'n I tell ee true.
    There now, didn't I tell you the truth.

    Lookzee, how she does scurry away poor lamb.
    Look now, how she scurries away poor lamb.

    Thik tunes his'n
    for certain sure.
    That voice is his for certain [or that voice is most definitely his]. (Also "tune" here carries a meaning something like, that's his way of being; he's being true to character by shouting).

    Did ee ever see the like of thik there in all thy barn days?
    Did you ever see the like of that in all your born days?

    Schoolmaster coming along also wold. Hark to the charn!
    The schoolmaster's coming along too. Listen to all the noise! (We are probably to imagine that the schoolmaster also joins in the row, either by telling off the old man for shouting at children, or by telling off the child for disturbing the old man).
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 02-Oct-2015 at 17:19. Reason: Typo correction.

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