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    #1

    A hearse

    Here are a few sentences with the word "hearse." Would you please correct my mistakes.

    1. For the last time, the President was driven though the capital in a hearse, which solemnly passed the street.
    2. As the pallbearers lifted a coffin off the hearse, they heard a pounding from inside the coffin, which scared them away.
    3. The procession consisted of six hearses covered in flowers and wreaths.
    4. The road was full of potholes and a coffin in a hearse was hitting the sides of the car.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A hearse

    In your first, I would say "passed on the street".

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    #3

    Re: A hearse

    I would expect the pallbearers to release the occupant of the coffin rather than run away.

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    #4

    Re: A hearse

    #1 makes it sound like the President had been driven through town in a hearse often.

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    #5

    Re: A hearse

    SoothingDave,

    I am wondering if I could rewrite my 1. sentence like this:
    For the last time, the President was driven through the capital, this time in a hearse, which solemnly passed in the street.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A hearse

    For #2, I'd say 'lifted the coffin out of the hearse'. Most hearses are enclosed vehicles.

    Also, I'd suggest using the term 'casket' instead of 'coffin', unless it was actually a coffin.

    My initial feeling was that 'casket' sounds a little more solemn while 'coffin' sounds more horror-movie, but apparently there is a difference.
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    #7

    Re: A hearse

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    4. The road was full of potholes and a coffin in a hearse was hitting the sides of the car.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    I would be more comfortable with something like:

    "The road was full of potholes, so the coffin was sliding back and forth against both sides of the hearse."

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    #8

    Re: A hearse

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    but apparently there is a difference.
    I am not a teacher.

    That's interesting. As far as I know, "casket" isn't used in BrE. The oxforddictionaries.com says it's chiefly North American for coffin. I had a look at the first few search results that you linked to and all but one of them were American sites. The other one was Australian.

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    #9

    Re: A hearse

    I have always just considered them completely synonymous. I wasn't aware there was any technical difference until I posted.

    While you have to take Wikipedia entries with a grain of salt, it too suggests the distinction is more North American English.

    Maybe some of our Canadian members will chime in.

    Anyway, my original problem wasn't with the technical differences, but with as the connotations the two terms carry (ha!), but maybe those connotations are AmE or NAmE as well.
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