Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    Pluralizing

    I have noticed a recent trend to pluralize the noun following a number. Some examples include "ten days war" and "A 3 Years Warranty". This seems common practice in English speaking European countries but I have always felt it read awkwardly here in the U.S. I would love to know your opinion on this.


    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,883
    #2

    Re: Pluralizing

    I would use either ten days' war or a ten-day war. Ten days war is neither fish nor fowl and doesn't work for me.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: Pluralizing

    I would expect that answer from a British English speaker, as I wrote above, I realize it's common practice there. However, I was more curious as to the American perspective. In all of my life I have never pluralized the unit of time in this context.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: Pluralizing

    This AmE speaker agrees with Tdol.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #5

    Re: Pluralizing

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    This AmE speaker agrees with Tdol.
    A fact which was entirely clear from your clicking on "Like" on Tdol's post.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: Pluralizing

    The OP seemed to be looking for another opinion.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 3
    #7

    Re: Pluralizing

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The OP seemed to be looking for another opinion.
    Not far from true but I'm not expecting blind agreement. I was hoping for some etymology or evidence of historical usage in the U.S. so that I had a better understanding. I've posed this question and offered the same examples to several of my friends and they have all responded negatively to the pluralization of the time unit. A few of these friends are teachers, there's a middle school principal, even professors of English. All agree that "24 HourS Drive-thru" sounds and reads awkward as do the other examples. I consulted both the Chicago Manual of Style and The Elements of Style and both concur with my opinion yet I continue to find this odd usage. It wasn't until just a few years ago that I had ever read the phrase "A 3-years Guarantee" and I remember thinking how silly it was, then. My boss (at the time) was Jamaican by birth but a graduate of both Oxford and Cambridge and insisted on the odd phrasing whenever I wrote an RFQ/RFP.

    For the most part, my search for understanding is just entertainment. The "s" does annoy me, though :)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #8

    Re: Pluralizing

    I find the "s" equally strange and slightly annoying. For me, it should read "24-hour Drive-Thru", although I realise that the hyphen would look odd given that "24" and "hour" aren't on the same line. It surprises me that they bothered with the hyphen for "Drive-Thru" but failed to use one correctly above it.

    For me, for "24 hours" to be used, I would need to change it to "Drive-Thru: Open 24 Hours". No hyphen obviously.

    I'll save my dislike of "thru" for a different thread!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] pluralizing last name: Hancock.
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2009, 07:42
  2. Pluralizing last names
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2004, 12:47
  3. Pluralizing a last name
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Nov-2004, 10:43
  4. Pluralizing x's
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2003, 01:29

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •