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    #1

    wind up, to terminate or to conclude

    Which does "wind up" mean, "to terminate" or "to conclude" or both?
    For example,
    Today we'll wind up that deal with the bank.
    It means we are going to terminate the deal that has existed, or we are going to reach an agreement on the deal with the bank.
    They are so different. One means the existing deal is going to end, and the other means the new deal is going to begin.
    Which one is correct?
    Thank you

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    #2

    Re: wind up, to terminate or to conclude

    Today we'll wind up that deal with the bank.

    'Wind up' is used in two rather different ways:

    1. To input energy as in to wind up a clock spring so it will run for several hours. In the same way a baseball pitcher will wind up to throw the ball to the batter.

    2. To conclude, to finish, to end at a (perhaps random) place after a series of events. "I don't want to wind up like that guy- in prison." This is also used in the past tense to talk about how things turned out. "We talked about several options, but wound up going to the movies."

    I would take your example sentence to understand that you have been negotiating some transaction with the bank. Today you will conclude your negotiations and reach some final agreement.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: wind up, to terminate or to conclude

    We also use "wind up" to mean "close down" a company. If a company or an individual is winding up its/his/her affairs, they are in the process of shutting a business down for good.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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