Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Sep 2015
    • Posts: 42
    #1

    You was

    I had heart a sentence from a film named scarface.

    "İf you have kept your mouth shut, they would think you was a horse"

    Why not "you were a horse" Can you please tell me?

  1. tkacka15's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2015
    • Posts: 175
    #2

    Re: You was

    I'd use "were", but I remember some who argued that you may use "was" here which refers to the complement "horse" in the clause "...you was a horse".
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 04-Oct-2015 at 22:09. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  2. teechar's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Iraq

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 6,183
    #3

    Re: You was

    Quote Originally Posted by say hello View Post
    I had heart heard this sentence from in a film named Scarface.

    "İf you have kept your mouth shut, they would think you was a horse"

    Why not "you were a horse" Can you please tell me?
    Non-standard English is not uncommon in films.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #4

    Re: You was

    The whole sentence is ungrammatical. Not surprising, as the story is about non-native English speaking gangsters.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Sep 2015
    • Posts: 42
    #5

    Re: You was

    How can we make this sentence to be grammaticaly correct? What would you say?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 04-Oct-2015 at 22:10. Reason: Deleting quote

  4. tkacka15's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2015
    • Posts: 175
    #6

    Re: You was

    "How can we make this sentence to be grammatically correct? What would you say?"

    It should be used in the third conditional form:
    "İf you had kept your mouth shut, they would have thought you were a horse".
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,502
    #7

    Re: You was

    Bradley Walsh, born near Watford and a resident native English speaker, a well-educated actor, comedian and game show presenter, regularly says 'you was' and 'was you?' in programmes like 'The Chase' on British TV.

    It's just the dialect he always uses and we have to put up with it. He must know it's non-standard, but he doesn't care.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #8

    Re: You was

    That seems to be fairly standard usage from that part of the UK. I'm not entirely convinced that he knows it's non-standard.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. tkacka15's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2015
    • Posts: 175
    #9

    Re: You was

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Bradley Walsh, born near Watford and a resident native English speaker, a well-educated actor, comedian and game show presenter, regularly says 'you was' and 'was you?' in programmes like 'The Chase' on British TV.

    It's just the dialect he always uses and we have to put up with it. He must know it's non-standard, but he doesn't care.
    I've heard the same in Manchester (UK); instead of "We were" my interlocutors used "We was".
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #10

    Re: You was

    I can't think of anywhere in the US where it's a normal part of the dialect. (There are variations everywhere, of course - I just haven't heard this one.)
    There is one woman I know who uses it exclusively. Just one. I sometimes wonder if her education was so appalling or if her family modeled it for some reason - perhaps being from an area in the UK where it was the norm.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •