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    #1

    Performative verbs

    Hello.

    Can Tie, Hold, Remain work as a performative verbs? In the contexts I stated below:

    TIE: Nadal-Djokovic is the most common meeting among men’s tour players since 1968. Federer-Djokovic ties for second; its next edition will push it past Ivan Lendl-John McEnroe.

    HOLD: He holds the records among male players for Grand Slam titles (17), reaching Grand Slam finals (27), consecutive Grand Slam semi-final appearances (23) and consecutive Grand Slam quarter-final appearances (36), among others.

    REMAIN: Now there remain three more tournaments for me.

    Looking forward to your answers.

    Dominik92

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Performative verbs

    No.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: Performative verbs

    Do you use these three words (in those contexts) in present continuous? As far as I know you almost donīt . Why it is that? I would expect not to use present continuous with stative verbs but not with those.

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    #4

    Re: Performative verbs

    In those contexts, I wouldn't use the present continuous. They are describing states rather than actions in those sentences IMO.

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    #5

    Re: Performative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In those contexts, I wouldn't use the present continuous. They are describing states rather than actions in those sentences IMO.

    Thank you.

    So the following sentence I have found is incorrect? :)

    "He finished second in both of his finals, which means he is tying with Oliver Millroy and Lee Bell on points"

    When would you use present continuous with those words ? Could you tell me please?
    Last edited by Dominik92; 07-Oct-2015 at 17:28.

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    #6

    Re: Performative verbs

    That should be "tied".

    With his last victory, he is close to tying James in points.

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    #7

    Re: Performative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That should be "tied".

    With his last victory, he is close to tying James in points.
    If I understand it well I should use those words as a state verbs even though it can not be find in one box with words like have, see etc. which donīt have continuous form. It would be much easier to consider them to be a state verbs :)

    + close to tying..... well I may be influenced by many textbooks but it is not present continuous but gerund. "close to" is followed by "-ing".
    Last edited by Dominik92; 07-Oct-2015 at 18:31.

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    #8

    Re: Performative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik92 View Post
    So the following sentence I have found is incorrect?
    I wouldn't use it, but clearly the person is not thinking of it in the same way, so I wouldn't go so far as to say it's plain wrong.

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