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    #1

    Does "they are safe to work on" mean "it is safe to work on them"; and meaning

    Hello everybody!

    The sentence is as follows:

    Identify pipelines that will be dismantled or valves that will be either opened or closed during the next 24 hours, including test results of the atmosphere within pipelines to verify that they are safe to work on.

    My first question is if "they are safe to work on" means "it is safe to work on them". In my opinion, they mean the same. What do you think?

    My second question is if "they" refers to "pipelines" or "valves" or "both". In my opinion, they mean "both". What is your opinion?

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Does "they are safe to work on" mean "it is safe to work on them"; and meaning

    Yes, you are right on both counts.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Does "they are safe to work on" mean "it is safe to work on them"; and meaning

    I agree with your first. The second is a little unclear. The way it is written, it seems to refer to pipelines, but the valves may be part of the pipelines.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Does "they are safe to work on" mean "it is safe to work on them"; and meaning

    The sentence is badly written in any case. Pipelines and valves don't include test results. (That could be fixed by replacing "including text results" with "including for tests".)
    I'd also consider a comma after the second 'pipelines'. That depends on whether i) the tests of the atmosphere within the pipelines are to verify whether they are safe to work on (which doesn't require a comma), or ii) you must also identify those pipelines that will undergo tests of their atmosphere unrelated to safety (which does require a comma).

    In fact, the sentence needs re-writing if a workman is to know what he must do from these instructions. I'm having trouble with the concept of working on a pipeline to do a test to see if it's safe to work on.

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