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    #1

    Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    https://www.englishforums.com/Englis...ggcqb/post.htm
    A native speaker of English says:"Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc." But I don't see any extra syllable in the contractions such as I'd, you'd, we'd, etc. Am I wrong? Besides, how many syllables are there in the word headmaster'd (= headmaster would)? I think there are three, but two native speakers of English say there are four.
    Last edited by sitifan; 10-Oct-2015 at 05:53.
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    What the first native speaker means is that you can reduce it to one syllable (I'd etc.) in the case of personal pronouns, but not in the case of a noun, e.g. John would, anybody would, some would.

    As to the second question, I agree with you: three.

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    #3

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    I habitually say who'd, anybody'd and nobody'd.

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    #4

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    As to the second question, I agree with you: three.
    Since two native speakers say there are four syllables, is it possible that some native speakers pronounce headmaster'd as head-mas-te-red?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #5

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    I would say headmaster'd with four syllables.

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    #6

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    If "headmaster" was a verb, the simple past "headmastered" would have three syllables.
    With "headmaster'd" as a contraction of "headmaster would", it has four syllables. "Head-ma-stuh-ruhd." (I don't do phonetics, that's just how I would break it down.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Pronouns subsume the extra syllable: I'd, you'd, we'd, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Since two native speakers say there are four syllables, is it possible that some native speakers pronounce headmaster'd as head-mas-te-red?
    It sounds more natural to me with four syllables.

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