Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 836
    #1

    Few bricks short of a load

    Hello,

    I like the phrase one uses to describe a person that is not clever too much To be few bricks sort of a load, but may I say He is many bricks short of a load to intensify it?

    Thanks a lot
    Not a Teacher

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,982
    #2

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    That would not be idiomatic.

  3. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 25,718
    #3

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    The point is that understatement is the kinder option. We try not to be too offensive to those who are less clever than ourselves.

  4. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,424
    #4

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    "...shy of a load' is how I am used to hearing it.

  5. VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,353
    #5

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    1. "He was ... about ten bricks short of a load." -- ALL I HAVE (2015), Google result.

    2. "I told her, have to be ten bricks short of a load to pull a stunt like that." --THE BLIND ASSASSIN (2007), Google result.

    3. " 'He's ten bricks short of a load,' Stanton agreed. 'But he's [as] strong as a grizz[ly bear].' " -- THE TRAILSMAN (2014), Google result.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,208
    #6

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnyxxx View Post
    I like the phrase one uses to describe a person that is not clever too much To be few bricks sort of a load, but may I say He is many bricks short of a load to intensify it?
    How about saying that he is a fair few bricks shy/short of a load?

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #7

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    You could also use "A sandwich short of a picnic". I particularly like that one.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 44,286
    #8

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    That's one of my favourites too though I've always used "Two sandwiches short of a picnic".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #9

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    My late father used to say "He's only four pence in the shilling". I don't know if it was unique to him or if others know of the expression.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  10. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,982
    #10

    Re: Few bricks short of a load

    I like 3 fries short of a Happy Meal.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] My house is made of/ from bricks.
    By wotcha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-Apr-2012, 02:19
  2. smashing bricks
    By saramehr in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2009, 10:46
  3. ton of bricks, felt on edge
    By gerlinecpp in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Jun-2009, 15:38
  4. [Grammar] bricks
    By ycal335 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2009, 14:27
  5. loosening and loss of tiles/bricks
    By yuiyui in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Nov-2005, 05:56

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •