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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #31

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    Quote Originally Posted by learner142 View Post
    ​Is "move it or lose it" it's normal use when you're asking someone to step aside?
    I've never heard it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #32

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    It's on the popular movie. Lloyd use it in "dumb and dumber" when he runs after Mary in an airport.

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    #33

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    I consider "move it or lose it" to be an idiom. It is an order followed by a threat, but its use is often not as serious as it sounds.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #34

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    Quote Originally Posted by learner142 View Post
    It's on from the a popular movie. Lloyd uses it in "Dumb and Dumber" when he runs after Mary in an airport.
    I've never seen that film although I have heard of it.

    If someone used the phrase to me or near me when they were trying to get past someone, I'm sure I would understand it.

    I know a phrase which sounds similar but has a different meaning - "Use it or lose it". I heard it at a presentation skills course when referring to a Powerpoint slide or a sheet of paper on a flipchart. It reminds the speaker that if they are not referring to the slide/sheet they should remove it from view so it does not distract the listeners from what is actually being said.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #35

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    Thanks. I see. I wonder what is the meaning of 'it' in this slang? Butt, ass? Because on a most american movies they use ass instead of body. For instance: "Edgar, get your butt down from there".
    Last edited by learner142; 25-Jan-2016 at 21:37.

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    #36

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    I was going to suggest just what you guessed.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #37

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    The "it" doesn't really refer to anything. If you want someone to get out of your way, you could (rather rudely) simply say "Move!" However, the rhyming idiom would not work without "it" being said twice. "Move or lose" wouldn't work.

    "Move it" can also be said when you're trying to encourage someone to move faster than they are currently moving. "Come on! Move it! We're going to be late."
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #38

    Re: What does it mean in context and slangs

    It's from the same movie: "too little too late, Harry". Lloyd said it when Harry his friend by accident hit big guy with a salt shaker.
    "Oh, man, you gotta be shitting me". Big guy caught Lloyd in toilet.
    And another: "Don't forget that your bread plate is on the left". Boss said it to Mental.
    Last edited by learner142; 29-Jan-2016 at 16:23.

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