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  1. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #1

    looked

    You see the change in his painting when expressionism took over, and he discovered you could paint how you felt, not how you looked. [Michael Rosen.]

    She looked daggers at him.

    Is "looked" a verb describing the use of the power of sight or the action of being perceived, regarded or judged by others in the above sentences?

    Thank you.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: looked

    In my opinion, it means that she was angry. It is not about the power of sight; it is about the facial expression that was viewed by others.

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    #3

    Re: looked

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Tkacka:

    Of course, I don't have the guts to answer your question.

    But I did some googling and thought the following would interest you as much as it did me.

    First, a definition of a cognate object.

    The book says an "intransitive verb ... may sometimes be followed by a noun already implied more or less in the verb."

    One example: "He slept [a verb] a sound sleep [cognate object]." [Even a dummy like me can see that "sleep" is implied in the verb "slept."]

    Now look here:

    Sometimes a cognate object is just understood.

    The book tells us that "They shouted applause" is short for "They shouted a shout of applause." *** "He played the fool" is a shorter version of "He played the part of a fool."

    I bet that you now know what the shorter version of "He looked daggers at me" is.

    The book's answer: "He looked me a look of daggars."

    Source: A Google result with this title: P. 42-43 Manual of English Grammar and Composition

    *****

    I also found an easier explanation.

    "The officer looked daggars at me" = "The officer looked angrily at me."

    The cognate object (daggars) modifies the predicate verb (looked) as the adverb "angrily" would do.

    Source: A CONCISE ENGLISH GRAMMAR(1918) by Kittredge and Farley.
    Last edited by TheParser; 18-Oct-2015 at 16:24.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: looked

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I bet that you now know what the shorter version of "He looked daggers at me" is.

    The book's answer: "He looked me a look of daggars.".
    The problem with that is that 'a look of daggers' is not natural English. It also has no meaning if you don't already know the expression 'look daggers at ...'

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: looked

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    Of course, I don't have the guts to answer your question.
    You have said similar things in a number of threads. Do you not have the courage of your convictions?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: looked

    Was "daggers" misspelt as "daggars" in both the books you quoted, TheParser?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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