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    #1

    could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Please help me.

    Please look at the context "could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv." I am confused about the usage of a in coulda. Is it a schwa sound. If yes, why it is presented by uh+v in coulda.

    Thank you

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    "could uhv" is a normal way to pronounce "could have" in sentences like "I could have done that" for example. "coulda" is non-standard and "slangy". You will hear it, though.
    Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.

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  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Quote Originally Posted by svetlana14 View Post
    Please look at the context "could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv." [/QUOTE
    I am confused about the usage of a in coulda. Is it a schwa sound. If yes, why it is presented by uh+v in coulda
    You haven't shown us the context in which it is so presented.

    Depending on what we hear, we could transcribe 'could have' in a number of ways, including /kʊd hv/, /kʊdəv/, /kʊdɔv/, or in, for example, Liverpool, /kʊrɘ(v)/.

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    #4

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Thank you. Here is the context. "Of, have, and to

    The words of, to, and have all tend to elide to nothing more than a schwa [ə] in many common situations. This sometimes leads to spelling confusion, such as writing "I could of..." instead of "I could have..." or "I could've".

    • could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv."


    Can you please explain to me whether "a" in coulda is a schwa and why one symbol is used in coulda (i.e. symbol "a") while uh is used in could uhv. Can write could av instead of could uhv. Many thanks.

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    #5

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Quote Originally Posted by svetlana14 View Post
    Can you please explain to me whether "a" in coulda is a schwa and why one symbol is used in coulda (i.e. symbol "a") while uh is used in could uhv. Can write could av instead of could uhv. Many thanks.
    'uh' is not used in phonemic transcription.

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    #6

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Thank you. So can I use coulduh instead of coulda or vice versa couldav? If not, what is the reason behind this. Thank you.

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    #7

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Quote Originally Posted by svetlana14 View Post
    Thank you. So can I use coulduh instead of coulda or vice versa couldav? If not, what is the reason behind this. Thank you.
    You can use none of these in standard written English,

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    #8

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Quote Originally Posted by svetlana14 View Post
    If yes, why it is presented by uh+v in coulda.
    Where is this from? The two item coulda and could uhv are not the same. The text doesn't make this very clear, but [ˈkʊɾəv] is not an alternative version of coulda:

    "could have: 1) [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or 2) [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv."

    Added to this, there are alternative pronunciations as Piscean says.

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    #9

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Thank you. It appears my question was incorrect. It is about the area of symbols that internet uses. Is the last symbol a in coulda schwa. Why they use coulda instead of could uh. Than you very much for your answer.

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    #10

    Re: could have: [ˈkʊɾə], coulda or [ˈkʊɾəv], could uhv.

    Symbols are not necessarily consistent. Even dictionaries may have their own system rather than sticking to the IPA. If they do that, then the internet is even more likely not to follow rules. Coulda is the written form, but it is pronounced with a schwa at the end. However, outside phonetics, we don't use the IPA symbols, so coulda is like gonna- a way of writing a common spoken form.

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