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    #1

    will/going to - two examples

    Hello all :)

    I was watching a tennis match at Eurosport 2 when one use of will confused me a bit. Serena Williams was about to serve to end the match. She had a ball in her hands and was prepared to serve. However commentator of the match didnīt use going to even though it was present evidence . I know that will and going to can sometimes be used interchangebly but when there is a present evidence - going to should be used. Why the commentator used will? What does it emphasize?


    She will serve for the match.



    Thatīs nice we will see two Swiss in the semis.

    - Would it be possible to use going to see instead of will see? What would it emphasize?




    Looking forward to your answers.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: will/going to - two examples

    You could use "will" or "going to" in each of your examples.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

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  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: will/going to - two examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik92 View Post
    - Would it be possible to use going to see instead of will see? What would it emphasize?
    I think it emphasizes 'very soon' according to the following definition:

    'be going to do something
    2 used to show that something is likely to happen very soon or in the future.'── quoted from http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...lish/go_1?q=go
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: will/going to - two examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik92 View Post
    know that will and going to can sometimes be used interchangebly but when there is a present evidence - going to should be used.
    When we use BE going to, there is present evidence. That does not mean that present evidence requires BE going to.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: will/going to - two examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik92 View Post
    Hello all. :)

    I was watching a tennis match at on Eurosport 2 when one use of will confused me a bit. Serena Williams was about to serve to end for the match. She had a ball in her hands hand and was prepared preparing to serve. However, the commentator of the match didn't use going to even though it there was present evidence. I know that will and going to can sometimes be used interchangeably but when there is a present evidence, going to should be used. Why did the commentator used use will? What does it emphasize?


    She will serve for the match.

    Thatīs nice. We will see two Swiss in the semis.

    - Would it be possible to use going to see instead of will see? What would it emphasize?


    Looking forward to your answers.
    Note my changes to your post above, marked in red.

    "To serve for the match" is a set phrase in tennis. It means that if the person serving wins that point, they will win the match. I am surprised at the use of "will" in that sentence. That's not because I would expect to hear "going to". It's because the usual phrase is "Serena is about to serve for the match" or "Serena is serving for the match".

    In your second example, both "will" and "going to" would be acceptable, as would "There will be two Swiss [players] in the final".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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