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    #1

    to illustrate

    It can cause a chain of serious problems. To illustrate, the temperature rises and, in turn, it melts the ice in north pole.

    In this sentence, is the usage of "to illustrate" correct or acceptable? Why/ not? I googled, but the examples are like:

    To illustrate his point, he drew a picture.

    To illustrate sth, S + V

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    #2

    Re: to illustrate

    Hello Vicky- I suppose this extract is from a magazine article or similar about climate. It seems correct to me. It would perhaps be more natural to put "illustrate this" ...
    Your googled example is a literal use of illustrate; ie: draw a picture. Your climate example means "for example" / "to demonstrate".

    On the other hand, if the -Temperature/melt/north pole- is the only chain of problems the writer has in mind then "illustrate" is a little odd. Exemplify/Explain/clarify/be specific/ they might be better choices, or simply "that is"...

    Sorry , I don't understand the result about S+V

    (by the way- you would put "at The North Pole", as it is a particular place, and in BrE we would use the definite article with it and the preposition "at")

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to illustrate

    Illustrate works. It can mean "exemplify".

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to illustrate

    I think the following definition fits the OP's sentence. 'Illustrate' can be intransitive, i.e. it can be used without a direct object.

    'illustrate
    v.intr.
    To present a clarification, example, or explanation.'── quoted from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/illustrate

    Quote Originally Posted by Peedeebee View Post
    Sorry , I don't understand the result about S+V
    'To illustrate something, subject + verb.'
    I am not a teacher.

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