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    #1

    British

    Are these sentences correct?
    1.He is British.
    2. He is a British.
    3. He is a British citizen.
    4. He is an American.
    5. He is a Japanese.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: British

    1.He is British. Correct.
    2. He is a British. Incorrect.
    3. He is a British citizen. Correct.
    4. He is an American. Correct.
    5. He is a Japanese. Not very natural. More natural without 'a'.

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    #3

    Re: British

    Quote Originally Posted by kyawwin View Post
    3. He is a British citizen.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    At another grammar helpline, I was told that the British people are not offended if you simply say that "He is a Brit."

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    #4

    Re: British

    I don't know any Brits who would be offended by that.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: British

    http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...british/briton
    Having read the above, I think 'He is a Briton' is possible in newspapers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    5. He is a Japanese. Not very natural. More natural without 'a'.
    I think this is because such words as Japanese, Chinese and Portuguese are usually used as an adjective.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: British

    I think of "Briton" as the formal or full version of "Brit." I don't know how the British think of it.

    Like "Yanks" is sometimes used for "Yankees."

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: British

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think this is because such words as Japanese, Chinese and Portuguese are usually used as an adjective.
    I agree.

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    #8

    Re: British

    So do I, tz, but clicking 'Like' should obviate the need for a post to say so.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: British

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I don't know any Brits who would be offended by that.
    I am not a teacher.

    I wouldn't say that I was offended by it, but I have heard it used pejoratively.

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    #10

    Re: British

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I wouldn't say that I was offended by it, but I have heard it used pejoratively.
    It would depend on the context, but I don't think it is the word itself that would be the problem.

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