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    #1

    England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germany.

    Plase. Say me the riht variant.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germ

    I am not a teacher.

    Are you really an English teacher?

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    #3

    Re: England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germ

    They are both fine, though the second is more commonly used nowadays, in British English at least.

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    #4

    Re: England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germ

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, PuhVinni:

    You have already received the answer.

    I only wanted to add a few comments.

    Here in the United States, it is my opinion that most people would simply say "Mona is not as tall as Betty."

    But some (a few?) people (especially in writing, when they have time to calmly think) would prefer ""Mona is not so tall as Betty."

    Why?

    Here is a theory that I once read. I do not know whether it is accurate.

    People are accustomed to hearing as ... as in affirmative sentences. ("Raul is as nice as George." )

    Some people feel, therefore, a negative sentence receives more emphasis by using "so": "Raul is not so nice as George."

    Personally speaking, I do think that the "not so ... as" version is very nice, and I try to use it in writing. In speech, however, I probably use the "not as ... as" version because that's what I have usually heard (and read) for more than 70 years, so I will say it without thinking.
    Last edited by TheParser; 21-Oct-2015 at 12:39.

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    #5

    Re: England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germ

    People are accustomed to hearing as ... as in affirmative sentences.
    This is the case, so your emphatic negative theory is interesting.

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    #6

    Re: England is not so big as Germany. or England is not as big as Germ

    Quote Originally Posted by PuhVinni View Post
    Please tell me the right variant.
    See above.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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