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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 1
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    #1

    Unhappy Bring something(someone) and bring something(someone) with you

    I am Japanese. My American friend (and some textbooks) told me "Bring your homework with you".
    I understand the meaning, but would it not okay to use "Bring your homework" (without with because it would be obvious)?
    Or, are there differences between "bring something" and "bring something with you"? Thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 702
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    #2

    Re: Bring something(someone) and bring something(someone) with you

    I suppose it is a little silly. I guess it's just one of those idiomatic things that native speakers say.

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