Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 433
    #1

    take somebody's word for it

    I understand this idiom means to believe in what somebody is saying. Does it also imply that this 'somebody' can be held responsible / face the consequences (whatever these may be) for saying something which turns out not to be true? If not, is there an English idiom which combines the two meanings?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    Yes, there could be consequences associated with that phrase: loss of reputation, loss of friendship, etc.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Jarek Steliga:

    I am replying only because I thought that you would like to know another expression with a somewhat similar meaning.

    Mona: I wonder who is going to be elected president in 2016.

    Raul: _____ _____ will be elected. Period. End of discussion.

    Mona: Are you sure?

    Raul: You can take it to the bank. (I guess that "it" refers to Raul's confident prediction.)

    (If Raul turns out to be wrong, will he "be held responsible"? I will let you decide for yourself.)

  2. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,017
    #4

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    Quote Originally Posted by JarekSteliga View Post
    I. Does it also imply that this 'somebody' can be held responsible / face the consequences (whatever these may be) for saying something which turns out not to be true?
    These consequences are not normally implied, in my opinion. Speakers who use them are simply confident that what they have said is correct/accurate/true..

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    Not always true. "I did not cheat on you with Marsha. Take my word for it." But he did cheat. "I supported you for student council president. Take my word for it." But he supported someone else.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 433
    #6

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    Your comment made me realize that we are probably speaking here of two very distinct idioms/expessions/situations (however in my opening post I clearly referred to only one of them).

    1. "Take my word for it" - meaning, you may depend on what I say (and the possibility that what I say is in fact wrong is not even taken into consideration)

    2. "I will take your word for it" - meaning, I accept what you are saying as the truth, but if what you are saying should actually turn out to be wrong, I will come back to you and confront you, demand an explanation, hold you responsible for possible unpleasant consequences resulting from your mistake or lie (and I take MikeNewYork's word for this )
    Last edited by JarekSteliga; 25-Oct-2015 at 22:03.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,017
    #7

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    Quote Originally Posted by JarekSteliga View Post
    Your comment made me realize that we are probably speaking here of two very distinct idioms/expessions/situations (however in my opening post I clearly referred to only one of them).
    No. It does not matter whose word we are talking about, it's the same thing. The consequences, if any, of somebody not telling the truth depend entirely on the context and the people involved.

    I, personally, would never take anybody's word on any serious matter unless I knew from long experience that they were trustworthy.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #8

    Re: take somebody's word for it

    I agree that it is the context that determines the responsibility- if I say I will take my lawyer's word for something, it would have a far greater responsibility attached than if I take a friend's word for something in a pub.
    Last edited by Tdol; 26-Oct-2015 at 07:57.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18-Jun-2012, 18:43
  2. Whats the word to describe an unncessary word??
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-May-2008, 20:10
  3. Word Checker 1 - The Dolch basic word list
    By Tdol in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 24-May-2004, 13:26
  4. Word Checker 1 - The Dolch basic word list
    By Tdol in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2004, 15:30

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •