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    #1

    A finger in the pie

    Hi,

    I would like to ask if I can use in the set phrase "to have a finger in the pie" definite article instead of indefinite article in front of the word finger.

    I think your sister may have a finger in the pie.
    I am absolutely certain your sister is the one who has the finger in the pie.

    Thanks a lot
    Not a Teacher

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A finger in the pie

    I don't find either of them particularly natural. I would use "her" in both sentences.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: A finger in the pie

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't find either of them particularly natural. I would use "her" in both sentences.

    That solves it all.
    Not a Teacher

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    #4

    Re: A finger in the pie

    But if you really feel the need to use an article, then I would choose the indefinite one.

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    #5

    Re: A finger in the pie

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    I was concerned that some beginning and intermediate learners would not realize that the expression is figurative. There is no actual pie, and there is no actual finger. The expression means "to be involved."

    I have made up two sentences that might interest some learners.


    1. I have been chosen to organize the class party. But I am having a difficult time. Every student thinks that s/he has the right to help organize the party. I wanted vanilla ice cream, but Mona insisted on strawberry; I wanted the party to end at 5 p.m., but Raul demanded that it end at 6 p.m.; and I wanted to play 1960s music, but Betty said that she wanted rap music. This job is impossible for me to do because everyone has a finger in the pie.

    2. The news tells us that there is now a lot of confusion, disorder, and violence in a certain part of the world. Everyone, of course, wants to bring peace to that area, but it is very difficult because many nations in the world have a finger in the pie. Nation A says to do this; Nation B says to do that; Nation C says to do this and that. The nations cannot agree on one policy.

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