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    #1

    in event

    Hello.

    Undocking and docking the ship overtime/in event.

    What does "in event" mean in this case?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: in event

    I think we need context and at least a complete sentence.

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    #3

    Re: in event

    There is no context. That is all I have. This is an extract from a repąir list. All I can say is rhat it was written by a person from Scotland.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in event

    It makes absolutely no sense to me. Even without the part after the slash, it's meaningless. "Undocking and docking the ship overtime" is not a sentence. Nor is "Undocking and docking the ship in event".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: in event


  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in event

    At a push, I can make a case for "Undocking and docking the ship - overtime" being a heading for a column listing hours of overtime which were spent undertaking those tasks. I don't see how it fits into a repair manual. "In event" still makes no sense.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: in event

    Maybe during a weather event, because it is more dangerous the rate is higher.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: in event

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    a weather event
    I am losing touch with what I used to know as the English language.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: in event

    I feel the same way when I read some of your Britishisms.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: in event

    I don't think this is anything to do with AmE and BrE unfamiliarity with each other's terms. "A weather event" strikes me as one of those unnecessary terms which tells us absolutely nothing. There is always a weather event happening everywhere in the world. Surely it's just weather. If the speaker means "bad weather for the activity being undertaken" then call it "bad weather" or actually specify that it's a storm or thunder or snow etc.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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