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  1. denismurs's Avatar
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      • Russian Federation
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    #1

    ON

    Hi,

    Could you help me with meaning the preposition "ON" in the next sentence:

    "All the TV programmes on before Top of the Pops finished early so the Band Aid video could be shown."

    I think the preposition "on" is related with the TV programmes and have meaning here what happened on the TV before some momemt.

    Am I right?

    Denis.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    • Posts: 24,104
    #2

    Re: ON

    That's right. If a TV show in on now, you can watch it. If it's not, you can't.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,919
    #3

    Re: ON

    Note that "off" isn't the opposite in this case. The opposite is "not on".

    My favourite show is on now. I'm going to get a drink and sit down to watch it.
    I was going to get a drink and watch my favourite show but I've just turned the TV on and the show's not on! They must have postponed it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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