Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. denismurs's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 69
    #1

    go off

    Hi everyone,

    May I use the preposition "off" in the next sentence?

    "The computer network has gone off so I can't send any emails this afftenoon."

    Denis.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: go off

    Your sentence is OK. But "off" is not a preposition there. It is an adverb.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,021
    #3

    Re: go off

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    But "off" is not a preposition there. It is an adverb.
    Some traditional grammars label it 'adverb'; others label it 'particle. To the Huddleston and Pullum school it's a preposition. Learners have to live with the fact that there is no general agreement on the word class of these little words.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,312
    #4

    Re: go off

    Computers and networks usually go down, not off.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Sep 2015
    • Posts: 109
    #5

    Re: go off

    That's true, Dave, but I believe the down is more metaphorical than off. Off comes from the traditional phrases switch off / switch on.


    I think to answer denismurs initial question, it's "yes".
    (If the network is down, then something has switched off, or been switched off, hasn't it?)

  4. denismurs's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2015
    • Posts: 69
    #6

    Re: go off

    Ok. "Go down" is more colloquial.

    Yes, I've understood from the exercise that there had been a failure which led up to disconnection of the network.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Sep 2015
    • Posts: 109
    #7

    Re: go off

    I see you have done some other posts about similar preposition questions, denismurs. As TheParser said in one of the others, they can drive you mad. I think it's true with many prepositions.
    When I was a teenager I used to get Idiom Tests from my German teacher as well as vocabulary tests. It was a great idea!

    If you like this kind of thing here's a good example. In BrE we say in the plane/ on the plane/ in the train/ on the train/ in the boat/ on the boat/ on the bus/ in the car, But if you said "I'm going on holiday on the car, they would think you were clinging to the roof rack.
    Why? Nobody knows. Often there are no rules. There are so many ways of saying things that you just have to learn eventually. Just keep trying them out with experienced English speakers!

  5. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,398
    #8

    Re: go off

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Computers and networks usually go down, not off.
    I concur - 'go off' seems unnatural, although I can figure out what is meant. We usually refer to computers either going down, as Dave mentioned, or perhaps 'go offline', but I don't think I've heard of them 'going off'.

    'Go off' sounds like either an explosion, or a timed countdown.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #9

    Re: go off

    If it is a preposition, where is its object? The only thing I call a particle is the "to" in an infinitive. I am quite comfortable with "adverb" here.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,921
    #10

    Re: go off

    I'm one of those people who refer to a long list of words generally as prepositions (on, off, under, above, in etc). For me, "to go off" is a phrasal verb and, again for me, that is something which consists of a verb plus a preposition. Verb = to go; preposition = off.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •