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    #1

    stamp on / stomp on

    As far as I know, both "stomp on" and "stamp on" have the meaning, " to tread heavily on".
    How do I distinguish them?
    I used to consider "to stomp on" is more dramatic or less formal way. Is that correct?
    Thank you

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stamp on / stomp on

    Please give some context.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: stamp on / stomp on

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Please give some context.
    I stomped / stamped on the sidewalk to get the dirt off my shoes.

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    #4

    Re: stamp on / stomp on

    Quote Originally Posted by joseph0928 View Post
    I stomped / stamped on the sidewalk to get the dirt off my shoes.
    The angry crowd knocked him down and stomped / stamped on him.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: stamp on / stomp on

    I am not a teacher.

    In those examples I would use stamp for the pavement (sidewalk), and stomp for the person.

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