Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Fazzu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tamil
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • Singapore

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 397
    #1

    replace 'z' or 's',here?

    Hello everyone,

    I got a question.

    Is it realize or realise?
    Is it realising or realizing?

    Thanks.
    Faz

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    Welcome, Fazzu. Great photo!

    Most words that Americans spell ending in "-ize" are spelled with "-ise" or "-ize" in Britain:

    apologize apologise, apologize
    apprise apprise (to inform)
    apprize apprize (archaic) (appraise, esteem)
    atomize atomise, atomize
    burglarize burgle, burglarise, burglarize
    capitalize capitalise, capitalize
    categorize categorize, categorise
    characterize characterise, characterize
    civilize civilise, civilize
    civilization civilisation, civilization
    colonize colonize, colonise
    computerize computerise, computerize
    criticize criticize, criticise
    dramatize dramatise, dramatize

    See more here: http://www.peak.org/~jeremy/dictiona...ellcat.php#ise

    The "-ize" version is the old British version and it is still used in Great Britain, for example at the University of Oxford and in academic publications. The "-ize" spelling is not an American invention, it existed long before the USA were founded (~15th century). Source

    It all began with izein in ancient Greek, which evolved into izare in post-classical Latin and then iser in French. English has been colonized with words from all three languages, including pulverize, moralize, and monopolize. While it's true that ise is often defined as a "British" preference, ize is actually a better choice most of the time, according to Britain's leading authority on language: the Oxford English Dictionary. (OED)

    Read more here
    Last edited by Casiopea; 10-Jun-2006 at 12:09.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #3

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    You will find that most British English writers always use the '-ise' ending for verbs such as this one, and most American English writers always use the '-ize' ending. This is a cause of great confusion and debate. The traditional answer is that '-ize' is used for English verbs which are derived from Greek words (for example, 'theorize'), and '-ise' is used for verbs derived from Latin or French (for example, 'realise', which comes from the French verb 'realiser'). Most native speakers are unaware of this distinction though, and tend to use one form or the other exclusively. So you will see inconsistent spellings.

  3. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #4

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    It gets even more confusing, because there are a few words which are spelled "-ise" in both British and American English: "advertise" is one (I was once torn to shreds on a newsgroup because I spelled it with "-ize", which one American took as proof that I was stupid). Another one is "enterprise" -- "Enterprise" (with an "s") was the name of the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, the famous starship from Star Trek and an experimental space shuttle.

    The trend though is for "-ize" to become more common.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    The trend though is for "-ize" to become more common.
    The USA seems to be somewhat undecided - no doubt related to the doowhachawannadoo attitude.

    From The American Heritage Dictionary
    v. merchandise also merchandize
    v. advertise

    From WordNet (Princeton University)
    v. merchandise
    v. advertise also advertize

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    (I was once torn to shreds on a newsgroup because I spelled [advertise] with "-ize", which one American took as proof that I was stupid).
    Apparently, s/he wasn't from Princeton.

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    Another one is "enterprise" -- "Enterprise" (with an "s")
    Note, verbs, not nouns: *merchandize (n.) *enterprize/Enterprize (n.); but nouns from verbs: advertis/zement; not *merchandis/zement, *enterpris/zement. merchand isn't a word in English, and enterprise isn't a verb.

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    It gets even more confusing, because there are a few words which are spelled "-ise" in both British and American English: "advertise" is one.
    Right. They're of Latin origin, and yet some are spelled (spelt? ) -ize.

    enterprise, Middle English > Old French > Latin inter-. + prendre
    advertis/ze, Middle English advertisen > Old French > Latin advertere
    merchandis/ze, Middle English > Old French > Latin mercari

    Here's an observation 'only good for remembering how to spell "advertise" and "merchandise".'
    ... this -ize/ise spelling difference only applies when the ending
    has the meaning of "convert something into something else"
    (e.g., Americanize, crystallize, galvanize), ...

    SOURCE

  5. Fazzu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tamil
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • Singapore

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 397
    #6

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    Thanks.

    So,I can use realise or realize,anything?

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7

    Re: replace 'z' or 's',here?

    AMERICAN ENGLISH
    realize

    BRITISH ENGLISH
    realise, realize

    The suffix -ize has been around in English since the late 16th century. This is such a useful suffix for making verbs from adjectives and nouns that it has become one of the most common in English; we got it via French, which of course uses the spelling -ise.

    It orginally comes from the Greek infinitive verb ending -dzein. As early as the 3rd century, Christians were taking Greek words such as baptidzein and Latinizing the endings, as in baptizare. Originally, only Greek base words were Latinized in this way, but then the French began using the ending for Latin base words, as in réaliser.

    ... many of these words were borrowed into English from French [e.g., réalise, réalize].

    At some point during the vogue for codification and standardization engendered by the Englightenment, some bright spark in England decided that all words with Latin bases should be spelled with -ise, and all words with Greek bases could continue to be spelled with -ize. Thus Britons got saddled with having to memorize even more irregular spellings than we have to [including the variants from French]--although more and more, they are using the -ize ending themselves.

    This idea never caught on in America, where -ize continued to be preferred.

    Source

Similar Threads

  1. college essay- what do i replace to be verbs
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 26-Sep-2009, 22:50
  2. Replace A Plural Noun With "those Of"
    By Jesule in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-Jun-2006, 14:15
  3. Does computer can replace teacher?
    By ilyana in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 21-Apr-2006, 14:27
  4. replace 'fix' instead of 'fixing.
    By terry in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2005, 19:25

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •