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  1. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #1

    A club suit then butts in to give out stink

    "He is now asked about those nasty reports about certain players not playing for him. He says that he cannot answer and that it is something that the press will have to ask the players, not him. A club suit then butts in to give out stink about the BBC for reporting those comments." [From The Guardian.]

    I understand the sentence
    A club suit then butts in to give out stink about the BBC for reporting those comments this way:
    A club agree (with him; with what he said) then (the club/club representative) interrupts (not invited to)
    the conversation to scold the BBC for reporting those comments.

    Is my understanding correct?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by tkacka15; 03-Nov-2015 at 19:07.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A club suit then butts in to give out stink

    Sometimes the word "suit" refers to a person. It is probably somebody in management. Now that you know that you should understand the sentence. Do you?

  3. tkacka15's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A club suit then butts in to give out stink

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Sometimes the word "suit" refers to a person. It is probably somebody in management. Now that you know that you should understand the sentence. Do you?
    Thanks for the clue. Now all is clear. That's a slang expression for "an executive", i.e. "suit", here, is a noun not a verb.
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A club suit then butts in to give out stink

    Quote Originally Posted by tkacka15 View Post
    Thanks for the clue. Now all is clear. That's a slang expression for "an executive", i.e. "suit", here, is a noun not a verb.
    That's exactly right.

  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: A club suit then butts in to give out stink

    Frequently 'suit' refers specifically to a lawyer or legal counsel as well.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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