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    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #1

    TV reruns

    What exactly is implied in the sentence "The show has been in heavy syndication since it ended in 1997". ??
    Does the term heavy place focus solely on the series being aired extensively in reruns in any one place, or is it also implied that the series is aired as reruns several times a day in major parts of the country, the globe, etc. (ie. is area also a factor here)?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: TV reruns

    More than one place would be my guess.

    syndication, selling (a television series, for example) directly to independent stations.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #3

    Re: TV reruns

    Thank you. I think I was staring at this one a trifle too long.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #4

    Re: TV reruns

    Oops - before leaving the subject of reruns altogether ...

    Would one write "on to" or "onto" in this phrase?:

    "It was a friend of mine from Canada who turned me ________ “Seinfeld”."

    Since it isn't a physical action (like ie. a cat jumping onto the table), but instead abstract, I'm having difficulty finding the proper spelling here.

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    #5

    Re: TV reruns

    I'd use two words turned me on + to


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
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    #6

    Re: TV reruns

    Thank you tdol. There wouldn't be any rule for this that I could read up on, would there?

    I often run into difficulty with "into/in to" and "onto / on to".

    I realize that when used as a preposition denoting movement towards (accusative case contra dative case), they are used in their compound form, ie. "The cat jumped onto the table" and "A car pulled into the parking lot".

    It's when I hit the abstract constructions that I get into (not in to ) trouble.

    Thanks for conforming one of my doubtful constructions for me.

    Rgs,
    Bill

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7

    Re: TV reruns

    Phrasal verb: turned on (to/by something).

    If the “on” is part of an expression like “turned on” it can’t be shoved together with a “to”.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
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    #8

    Re: TV reruns

    Bingo! Thank you!

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #9

    Re: TV reruns

    You're welcome, Bill.

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