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  1. NortT's Avatar
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    #1

    "Up in years" as an adjective

    Hello! Can I say "up in years person/people" instead of "old person/people"?
    Please, show me every single one of my mistakes. Thank you.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    No.

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    #3

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    You could say something like:

    "Nowadays most print newspaper readers in the United States are people up in age."

    NOTES:

    1. "print newspapers" are those printed on paper, not those on the Internet.

    2. "People up in age" may be short for "people who are up in age."

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    More generally, you can't (normally) use an adjectival phrase attributively (before its noun); a person who is down in the mouth is not a *'down in the mouth person', a rumour that is doing the rounds {="commonly heard"} is not a *doing the rounds rumour'... (and so on).

    b
    PS I suspect there are a few counterexamples, but my impression is that this is the common case.
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  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    2. "People up in age" may be short for "people who are up in age."
    These are not natural in BrE.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    ... Nor is one of my favourite Chaucer quotes: 'somewhat advanced in years'; but I still use it.

    b
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  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    "advanced in years" works fine for me in BrE. I have never heard, and don't like, "up in age".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    I don't like it either (AmE speaker).

  8. lotus888's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    I would accept:

    He was up there in age.



    --lotus

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    #10

    Re: "Up in years" as an adjective

    Long in the tooth also works.

    He is a little long in the tooth for the job.
    The actress is long in the tooth to get the role.
    Not a Teacher

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